Review: The Lost Family

lost familyRecap: The years during WWII were no easy feat for Peter Rashkin and his family. In New York in 1965, he has opened his own restaurant, named after his wife who was killed in the Holocaust along with their twin daughters. Peter finds comfort in food, but he also uses it as a mechanism to keep his wife alive; she, too, was a cook. It’s in his restaurant — a place more home to him than his apartment — that he meets June Bouquet, a beautiful starving model. He is astonished by her beauty and surprised to find that he feels more strongly toward her than any of the other women he’s dated in the years since his wife was murdered.

The story then jumps to New Jersey in 1975, where we follow June, who’s left the modeling industry to be Peter’s housewife and mother to their daughter Elsbeth. The whirlwind romance that brought Peter and June together is fizzling out, leaving June to seek out love and attention elsewhere. She longs for her career of yesteryear and chases after the experiences and emotions she felt ten years earlier.

Finally the story takes us to New York and New Jersey in 1985, when Elsbeth is now a teenager, becoming a woman and searching for her truth. As her parents’ relationship has worsened, so has her relationship with food. Her father constantly uses her as a guinea pig to try out new recipes, but her mother still picks at her food like she did during her modeling years. Elsbeth’s strange introductions to food lead to her own battle with her body.

Analysis: Not having initially realized the structure of this book — the ten-year time jumps and changing points of view — I initially found it a little jarring and definitely surprising. I got so lost in Peter’s story, I wasn’t ready to leave it. But once I understood this was going to be the book’s format, I absolutely loved it. Switching between the decades and characters simultaneously allowed for powerful and engaging generational and societal commentary.

I was also surprised to find that a book I wholly expected to be about the Holocaust — and much of it was — was really a story about a family and their relationship to food. Each person in this book has a completely different view about what foods means to them emotionally and physically, allowing food to serve as a metaphor for each of the characters’ relationships to each other.

The title The Lost Family can be interpreted in so many ways. It refers to Peter’s first family who he lost in the war. But it also refers to his new family, who loses themselves in their own drama. But the journey to them finding themselves makes it all worth it.

MVP: Peter. When he attempts a second shot at life with a new family, he doesn’t put in enough effort to strengthen their bond. But the difference between him and June is that he loves his daughter so deeply that she has the power to make him realize what’s missing and what he needs to do to find himself. His journey is sad and long, but uplifting in the end.

Get The Lost Family in paperback for $16.99. 

Or on your Kindle for $12.99.

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