Tag Archives: Audrina Patridge

LC’s Got Another Series Up Her Sleeve

The L.A. Candy series may have ended, but Lauren Conrad’s literary work won’t stop there.

The bestselling author and Laguna Beach and The Hills star is set to publish another 3-book series, called The Fame Game. According to this article from the Los Angeles Times, the series will be an L.A. Candy spinoff with fame whore Madison Parker as the main character.

At the end of Sugar and Spice, the final book in the L.A. Candy series, (spoiler!) we learn that Madison comes to terms with her secret past and moves forward, by doing charity work among other things. With the fairytale ending Conrad wrote for her, I have to wonder where she’s going to take the character in this other series.

Though I must admit: if any of the other supporting characters were going to get a spinoff series, it would be Madison. Though hated, she was still fun to read about.

I’m sure The Fame Game will be just as poorly written and one-dimensional as L.A. Candy is. But with Conrad’s name to it and more of that semi-autobiographical glimpse into her reality TV life, it’s sure to be another bestseller and — nothing for nothing — a good beach read.

 

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Review: Sugar and Spice

Recap: The L.A. Candy series comes to an end with the abrupt, predictable third novel, Sugar and Spice. The four girls who appear on the hit show, L.A. Candy, all have moments of realization about how un-real their “reality” show is.

Jane must decide between the two men who present themselves at the end of the second novel, Sweet Little Lies. Her best friend, Scarlett, attempts to have her first real relationship with a guy who refuses to appear on the show. Madison must deal with her secret past, when her (spoiler!) sister shows up in LA. And Gaby struggles with what she wants to do and what her new publicist is pushing her to do.

The themes of friendship and relationships continue in this book, as the girls confront each other, the show’s producer, and the paparazzi.

Analysis: In the final book of the semi-autobiographical series from Lauren Conrad, of Laguna Beach and The Hills fame, the lies and coverups become too much. The girls finally realize that being on a reality show, controlled by a hypnotizing, but deceitful producer, was never what they wanted. In the end, the girls learn what they want, who they are, and take steps toward refocusing their energy and time on what’s right for them.

Sugar and Spice does what the rest of the L.A. Candy series does — gives us a fluffy, light story that still manages to intrigue us. There’s a twist in Jane’s story that irritated me, but I ultimately decided it made sense in order to show her character’s growth. And though the writing is poor and the plots predictable, we have to wonder, is this what things were really like for Lauren Conrad when she was on The Hills? And it’s for that reason that we keep reading.

Not only is the ending inevitable, it also feels rushed. Scarlett’s storyline in particular was wrapped up quite quickly, and I found myself almost forgetting about Gaby altogether. This novel was also the shortest of the 3-book series. There’s no question that Conrad could have done a better job explaining how things ended. Instead, the last 2 or 3 chapters read like an epilogue.

MVP: Jane Roberts. The girl finally got a clue! After three books of reading about her and her horrible life choices, it’s nice to see the girl grow up and not be so naive.

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Review: Sweet Little Lies

Recap: The second novel in Lauren Conrad’s L.A. Candy series, Sweet Little Lies tells the story of Jane Roberts coming to terms with her relationships. At the end of L.A. Candy, indecent photos of her and her non-boyfriend, Braden, have been published in the tabloids. In Lies, Roberts relies on her new BFF, Madison, to get her life back on track. But her close bond with Madison pushes her away from longtime BFF, Scarlett. Scarlett moves on with a new man and unexpected friendship with Gaby (the “reality” show’s 4th lead girl). But Jane continues to spiral, making all the wrong decisions. She resumes her relationship with ex-boyfriend and celebrity manwhore, Jesse, and continues to confide in Madison – though she’s the one leaking all of her personal information to the gossip world. Ultimately, the sweet little lies come out.

Analysis: This novel serves its purpose: it’s a light and fluffy book that more or less gives tweens a look into Lauren Conrad’s life on The Hills. Though the plots are fictional, the series is semi-autobiographical, telling the story of two girls who move to L.A. and magically get picked to star in a new reality show.

The novel does a good job of showing how unrealistic “reality” TV is. For instance, when the show’s producer learns his “star” and boyfriend have broken up via text message, he begins piecing together a “breakup scene,” so the viewers will “understand what happened.” We also get further insight into the producer’s edits, with Scarlett picking her scenes apart word for word.

Aside from the ­­obvious platform on the current state of “reality” TV, this book is about relationships, between both lovers and friends. Friends become lovers (Scarlett and Liam). Friends grow apart (Scarlett and Jane). Girls become friends with each other too quickly (Jane and Madison). And someone you never thought you’d become friends with is suddenly your confidante (Scarlett and Gaby). Relationships are never easy, and that’s what Jane learns here. At points, she doesn’t know who to trust. Her boyfriend is abusive, her truest friend is out of her life, and her current friend is using her.

Jane’s a damsel in distress and annoying. But as readers, we relate to her for the same reasons the viewers of her show relate to her. We’ve all been there. We’ve all had friendships that have died, been revived, or grown. And when it comes down to it, we all know who will be there for us in the end.

MVP: Diego Nieri aka D. D’s a minor character, but he saves the day and shows Jane how naïve she’s been. D’s a little sidekick; a friend of Jane and Scarlett, who pops up a few times throughout the novel. But when he does, it’s always with flavor. He’s gay and fabulous, but most importantly reliable. In a city where Jane learns she has no one to trust, D is her rock. He protects his girls. And scenes with D always make me laugh. (Think Anthony Marentino in Sex and the City.)

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