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Lara’s Top Picks of 2017

booksWelcome to my seventh edition of “Top Picks!” Easily one of my favorite blog posts of the year, this is where I explain which were my ten favorite books I read this year. Again, this has nothing to do with what year they came out. In fact, I’m pretty sure none of the books I read this year were published in 2017. For a list of the best books published this year, check out The New York Times annual Notable Books list. For now, here are the best books I read this year (followed by the complete list of all the books I read this year).

10. Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher. With the hype over the TV series, it was finally time to read the bestselling YA novel that had been on my “to-read” list for a couple of years, and the book is much better than the series. It is more streamlined, focusing on a girl who — before she commits suicide — records audiotapes on which she describes why and who led her to the decision of taking her own life. It is haunting, but telling in the way it discusses depression, high school, human interactions, and how one seemingly small act can have big impacts. Buy it now.

9. Best Day Ever by Kaira Rouda. This Gone Girl-esque story about a man trying to kill his wife is chilling, but the format is what makes it stand out from other similar novels. Written completely from the husband’s perspective until the epilogue, the book has a scary way of showing how a sociopath is one kind of person on the outside and a completely different person on the inside.  Buy it now.

8. When the Future Comes Too Soon by Selina Siak Chin Yoke. This WWII-era novel shows the war from a viewpoint we don’t usually get in novels: that of a Malayan woman whose town has been bombed. The story is one of heartbreaking family drama and female power, detailing how the war affects her husband’s health, her marriage, and the new relationships she forms. Buy it now.

7. All the Best People by Sonja Yoerg. This powerful story about four women from the same family is all about relationships. Going back and forth between character and time period, it shows that no matter the age or era, we are all struggling to find answers and understand each other. Buy it now.

6. Scrappy Little Nobody by Anna Kendrick. In this hilarious memoir, Anna Kendrick gives us an honest glimpse into her awkward and yet, extremely successful career. She’s only 32 years old, but she reminds us just how much she’s accomplished in those years and why a memoir for such a young actress is warranted. She’s got the stories to back it all up. Buy it now.

5. Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty. The book — and the HBO series — are worth the hype. This female-driven novel is more than just women’s fiction. It’s a murder mystery. It’s an honest portrayal of domestic abuse. It’s a solid representation of fierce women building each other up instead of taking each other down. Buy it now. 

4. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. This book and Hulu series are also worth the hype. (Gosh, looks like there’s a running theme here…) This bestselling novel has won a plethora of awards for a reason. The feminist novel is set in a dystopian future in which the world population has decreased because of problems with reproduction. The handmaids are essentially trapped in a men-run world, forced into rape and abuse. But with every incident comes more incentive to try and get out. Buy it now. 

3. Lord of the Flies by William Golding. The ultimate classic tale of what happens when a bunch of kids are trapped on a deserted island is as relevant as ever. The only thing better than the plot and characters are the layers and layers of metaphor and symbolism. The book explains pretty much all we know and understand about the roots of evil and human nature. Buy it now.

2. When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi. It hurts me to make this #2 because it just as easily could have been my number one pick for the year. This memoir penned by a dying doctor in his 30’s is the most honest portrayal of death and the search for the meaning of life that I have ever come across. This book will make you cry, but it will also make you think. I finished it two weeks ago, and I already want to re-read it with a highlighter so I can save my favorite quotes. Thank you, Paul, for leaving this beautiful piece of work for us before you left our world. Buy it now

1. A Race Like No Other by Liz Robbins. You don’t have to be a runner, nor do you need to be a New York to appreciate this nonfiction book about the magic that is the New York City Marathon. Year after year, it is one of the most challenging feats for anyone to overcome. It is painful. It is crazy. But it is awe-inspiring and stunning. It is captured beautifully by this sports journalist who follows the elite athletes who run it to win, the addicts who run it to prove something to themselves and their families, the sick who run it to show they are still strong and the charitable to run it for the greater good. Nothing will change your life like a marathon, and this book explains why. Buy it now.


Scrappy Little Nobody – Anna Kendrick

The Corrections – Jonathan Franzen

Big Little Lies – Liane Moriarty

Walk Into Silence – Susan McBride

Modern Romance – Aziz Ansari

All the Best People – Sonja Yoerg

True Colors – Kristin Hannah

The Lord of the Flies – William Golding

Fame Junkies – Jake Halpern

Valley of the Dolls – Jacqueline Susann

Can’t Buy Forever – Susan Laffoon

When the Future Comes Too Soon – Selina Siak Chin Yoke

The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood

That Crazy Perfect Someday – Michael Mazza

A Race Like No Other – Liz Robbins

Best Day Ever – Kaira Rouda

And Then I Am Gone: A Walk with Thoreau – Mathias B. Freese

Thirteen Reasons Why – Jay Asher

When Breath Becomes Air – Paul Kalanithi

The Bookworm – Mitch Silver


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Lara’s Top Picks of 2016

booksIt’s the end of the year, so you know what that means. It’s time for my top book picks of 2016! As always, this is NOT — I repeat, NOT — a list of my favorite books that came out this year. This is a list of my favorite books I read this year, regardless of what year they came out. (And as always, for those of you who want to read a list of the best books that came out this year, I recommend the New York Times’ Notable Books of 2016 list.) That said, there are probably more “new” books on this list than in years past and several books by some of my favorite authors. It’s also worth noting that I struggled picking between my #1 and #2 choices, as they’re both equally fantastic. It’s also the first year my list has included a play! (Any guesses which mega bestseller that might be?) As always, below my top picks list is a list of ALL the books I read this year — a year I happened to slack. Don’t judge me! Read on for some great book suggestions to follow you into 2017, which will hopefully be another great year of books!

10. A Million Little Pieces by James Frey. Oprah Winfrey picked this read as an Oprah’s Book Club book back in 2005 as a nonfiction memoir about addiction and getting clean, and instead it became controversial after it was determined that the author embellished much of what he had written, but it’s still a gripping read. I believed the narrator’s struggle and enjoyed it with the mindset that it was fiction or “enhanced” nonfiction. Buy it now.

9. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot by Kim BarkerIn this actual memoir, Kim Barker delves into the world of journalism in the Middle East. The book feels more like a compilation of vignettes of her experiences that include everything from getting interviews with Middle Eastern warlords to partying hard with other foreign correspondents in a very real depiction. Buy it now.

8. Meet the Regulars by Joshua D. FischerAlso a compilation book, this one profiles random New Yorkers and the bars/coffee shops/restaurants/hangouts they frequent. It works for NYC-lovers who may just be looking for foodie recommendations, but it also works as a subtle study on people, why they like what they like and why they do what they do. Buy it now.

7. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by John Tiffany and Jack ThorneIt was not the greatest of the Harry Potter stories; in fact, I found it fairly repetitive and cyclicle from the original novels, but it holds its own and is just plain nice to once again connect with the characters we know and love — and their offspring. Buy it now.

6. The Tumbling Turner Sisters by Juliette Fay. A little bit Water for Elephants and a little bit Little Women, this new historical fiction novel (one of my favorite genres) explores a family of strong women performing as a traveling tumbling act as a means to an end during the early 1900s. It debuted at exactly the right time – a year in which strong females became a focal point. Buy it now.

5. The Tenth Circle by Jodi PicoultThough the ending wasn’t my favorite, I read this story about a rape victim and the death of her alleged rapist on vacation and couldn’t put it down. Its parallels with Dante’s Inferno add another layer of interest making this a page turner in true Jodi Picoult fashion. Buy it now.

4. The Hopefuls by Jennifer CloseIn an election year, this book about how demanding, exhausting, scandalous and ridiculous a political campaign can be was a perfect fit. The novel follows two young couples as one husband runs for political office, and the other husband — who can’t quite hack it as a politician — runs his “friend’s” campaign instead. Buy it now.

3.  Me Before You by Jojo MoyesA young woman is hired to care for a paraplegic who wants nothing more than to end his life. While controversial, the book is also insanely romantic and delves into paralysis in a way other mainstream books haven’t seemed to conquer. In the end, it’s a book about finding yourself and deciding what you want from life. Buy it now.

2. Year of Yes by Shonda RhimesThis memoir/self-help book is everything you could want from both a memoir AND a self-help book. Grey’s Anatomy, Scandal and How to Get Away with Murder creator/producer/writer Shonda Rhimes writes about her behind-the-scenes experiences working on these shows and the benefits she reaps as a show creator, but also details her hesitance and how forcing herself to say “yes” to everything changed her life. Truly inspiring. Buy it now.

1. The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah. Two sisters separate in France during WWII, where the Holocaust is gaining momentum. One sister cares for her family, while the other works to save as many people as she can. But the story’s back-and-forth persepective between the sisters as well as the time jump between WWII and modern-day U.S. — where only one sister has survived — makes the saga breathtaking, tear-inducing, and monumentally profound. Buy it now.

A Million Little Pieces – James Frey

Revenge Wears Prada – Lauren Weisberger

The Nightingale – Kristin Hannah

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot – Kim Barker

Allegiant – Veronica Roth

Baggage – S.G. Redling

Year of Yes – Shonda Rhimes

Ragtime – E.L. Doctorow

The Tumbling Turner Sisters – Juliette Fay

Me Before You – Jojo Moyes

Sunsets of Tulum -Raymond Avery Bartlett

The Tenth Circle – Jodi Picoult

Meet the Regulars – Joshua D. Fischer

The Hopefuls – Jennifer Close

The End of the Age of Innocence – Alan Price

All the Summer Girls – Meg Donohue

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child – John Tiffany and Jack Thorne

Losing It – Emma Rathbone

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Lara’s Top Picks of 2015

booksIt’s the most wonderful time of the year. For my blog. It’s that time where I post my personal “Best Of” list for 2015. And as I’ve done in years past, this is a list of the ten best books I personally read this year — NOT a list of books that were published this year. (For that, check out the New York Times.) Most of the books on my list are at least a few years old, and it just took me until now to get around to reading them. Anyway, keep reading for a pretty great list of books, and scroll to the bottom for the complete list of the 25 books I read this year.

10. Insurgent by Veronica Roth. A follow-up to the bestselling young adult Divergent series, Insurgent follows Tris and Four as they aim to take down the leader of a government gone wrong. While Divergent is mostly exposition and setup for the rest of the YA series, Insurgent is almost all action and continues to put Tris at the forefront of strong feminist characters. Buy it now.

9. Armada by Ernest Cline. A high schooler and video game junkie’s dreams and worst fears come true when he learns the video game he’s been playing is actually training for a real world alien battle he must help fight. The follow-up to Cline’s bestseller Ready Player One is not as innovative or good as Player, but it incorporates the pop culture references, adventure and heart that made his debut novel so special. Buy it now.

8. The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling. A small town in the UK is turned upside down with a dark chain of events when an untimely death leads to an opening on the town’s parish council. This was the first adult novel Rowling wrote after her Harry Potter series came ended, and while some felt it was too dark and twisty, I felt it was perfect. That darkness Rowling writes with is what made her later Potter novels so great and what makes the events of this one so unexpected.Buy it now.

7. The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt. The death of Theo’s mother leads him to a strange world: the underworld of art, as he carries around a mysterious piece of art throughout all the highs and lows of his hard, inconsistent life. The Goldfinch is LONG, yes, but it’s beautifully written and tells an intriguing story of an intriguing boy and life. It won a Pulitzer Prize for a reason.Buy it now.

6. A Letter to My Mom by Lisa Erspamer. A collection of essays and anecdotes about mothers come together in this cute book that will make you laugh, smile and cry hysterically. It was a book that made me think of my mom, thank my mom and know exactly what I’m giving her next Mother’s Day. Buy it now.

5. The Martian by Andy Weir. Man goes to Mars; man gets stuck on Mars; NASA spends years effecting bringing him home, while he figures out a way to survive on his own. It’s an amazing story, which seems totally plausible — if someone as smart and amazing as Mark Watney were to ever get stuck up there. This bestseller-turned-book is not only powerful and intense, it’s also funny, funny, funny and incredibly enjoyable. Buy it now.

4. The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins. Alternating narrators connects the stories of the drunken, depressed woman who rides the train, her ex and the couple whose house she passes everyday on the train. Dubbed “the next Gone Girl,” The Girl on the Train is a suspenseful murder mystery and thriller that keeps you turning pages in a classic whodunit story with a modern twist. Buy it now.

3. Stories I Only Tell My Friends by Rob Lowe. Rob Lowe narrates the story of his rise to fame on this audiobook memoir with stories of celebrity and scandal, work and success. Stories is great because it offers exactly what one wants from a celebrity memoir — behind-the-scenes secrets and details of some of his greatest films and TV shows and details of his scandals of the 1980s. Buy it now.

2. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs. When Jacob goes to Wales to research more about this late grandfather, he learns that he and his grandpa share no only a special, sci-fi, fantastical connection, but also a whole other secret world. It’s a YA novel that feels more adult, and is filled with excitement, wonder, heart and bravery — the first in a series of Miss Peregrine books, the rest of which I can’t wait to read. Buy it now.

1.  Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team, and a Dream by H.G. Bissinger. A behind-the-scenes look at the real-life 1988 Permian Pantheers football team from Odessa, Texas, this is the book that started the FNL sensation. This nonfiction story is even more heart-wrenching and despairing than the story lines on the show, but it’s the detailed, beautifully written prose by Buzz Bissinger that makes this version exceptional. Buy it now.

The Goldfinch – Donna Tartt

I’m Glad I Did – Cynthia Weil

Amazon Burning – Victoria Griffith

Insurgent – Veronica Roth

The Girl on the Train – Paula Hawkins

At the Water’s Edge – Sara Gruen

Whip Smart: Lola Montez Starts a Revolution – Kit Brennan

Unorthodox – Deborah Feldman

The Casual Vacancy – J.K. Rowling

A Letter to My Mom – Lisa Erspamer

Then Again – Diane Keaton

The Storyteller – Jodi Picoult

Paper Towns – John Green

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children – Ransom Riggs

Dark Places – Gillian Flynn

Alexander Hamilton – Ron Chernow

Stories I Only Tell My Friends – Rob Lowe

Bond Girl – Erin Duffy

The Martian – Andy Weir

The Ocean at the End of the Lane – Neil Gaiman

Inconceivable! – Tegan Wren

Mockingjay – Suzanne Collins

Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team, and a Dream – H.G. Bissinger

Armada – Ernest Cline

Walking Distance – David Hlavsa

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Lara’s Top Picks of 2014

Well folks, it’s time for my favorite blog post of the year. It’s time for my personal “Best Of” list. I must reiterate that this is a list of the best books I’ve read this year — NOT the best books that came out in 2014. (If I’m being completely honest, of the 24 books I read this year, I think only two or three were actually released in 2014.) If you’d like a 2014 “Best Of” list, check out the New York Times’ 100 Notable Books of 2014. If you want to check out some really kick-ass books I loved this year, keep reading. And scroll to the bottom for a complete list of all the books I read this year! Bring on 2015!

10. Silver Linings Playbook by Matthew Quick. An English teacher and Eagles football fanatic snaps and spends years in a rehab facility, only to return home and find that everything has changed, including himself. Moving on proves harder than he thought it would be. The bestseller-turned-Oscar-winning-movie is a showcase of mental illness and how devastating loss can be. Buy it now.

9. The Winter People by Jennifer McMahon. A haunting tale of murders and mysterious disappearances, this novel is chilling and twisted with lots of characters and deep, dark secrets as two young girls try to piece together what happened in their town and their home about 100 years ago that led to their mother’s recent disappearance. Buy it now.

8. Orange Is the New Black by Piper Kerman. After watching the Netflix series, I had to read the autobiography on which it was based, and I’m glad I did. Now that I know the true story about what happened to Piper, I feel a lot better. You will too. But don’t worry — both the painful and humorous anecdotes are included in this telling of a woman who serves a year in an all-female prison. Buy it now.

7. Divergent by Veronica Roth. The start to another YA dystopian series, this book is a bestseller for a reason. Once they reach a certain age, teenagers have to choose a “faction,” based on their personalities, behaviors and instincts. But when one girl fits into several different “factions,” she starts a much-needed, exciting, painful, and thrilling revolution. Buy it now.

6. 27 by Howard Sounes. You think you know everything about the deaths of Amy Winehouse, Brian Jones, Jim Morrison, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Kurt Cobain. But you don’t. The uncanny coincidence that they all died at the age of 27 gave biographer Howard Sounes enough of a reason to further investigate this in the nonfiction book simply and eerily titled 27.  Buy it now.

5. Dare Me by Megan Abbott. What a dark story, but what a good one. A cheerleading squad is busy enough doing drugs, skipping meals, and perfecting their bodies to realize that its coach, captain, and squad member are somehow caught up in a murder that appears to be a suicide. The mind games that go on in this novel were enough to make my head spin and my hands turn another page. Buy it now.

4. Astonish Me by Maggie Shipstead. The second of Maggie Shipstead’s novels isn’t quite as good as her first, but its beautiful story about a dancer who gives up her life as a professional ballerina for family is rather…astonishing. It centers on a scandal, much like Shipstead’s first novel, but the focus on dance and the complex relationships it weaves adds a layer of intrigue. Buy it now.

3. Seating Arrangements by Maggie Shipstead. This bestseller about the beach wedding of a pregnant bride, who comes from a prominent New England family is more than just a scandalous, juicy beach read. It feels like true literature, like an Edith Wharton novel written in the modern day. It’s a painful, but fun and interesting take on who people really are compared to who they seem to be or want to be. Buy it now.

2. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green. it’s more than the bestselling YA novel about a girl with cancer who falls in love. It’s a coming-of-age story. it’s a beautiful statement about what young love can mean, and a display of how good young adult fiction can be, even if it’s not a sci-fi dystopian novel. Buy it now.

1. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand. Bestselling author Laura Hillenbrand takes us on the journey of Louie Zamperini’s life — a true story of an Olympian and WWII POW and hero. What he endured is truly incredible. An inspiring read for anyone, especially as we head into the new year. Buy it now.

Tick to the Tock – Matthew Turner

The Age of Miracles – Karen Thompson Walker

The Fault in Our Stars – John Green

The Cabinetmaker – Alan Jones

Unbroken – Laura Hillenbrand

Orange Is the New Black – Piper Kerman

On Grace – Susie Orman Schnall

Committed – Elizabeth Gilbert

A Fool Among Fools – John Terracuso

The Lucky One – Nicholas Sparks

Divergent – Veronica Roth

Seating Arrangements – Maggie Shipstead

I Remember Nothing – Nora Ephron

The Never Never Sisters – L. Alison Heller

Silver Linings Playbook –Matthew Quick

27 – Howard Sounes

Astonish Me – Maggie Shipstead

Prep – Curtis Sittenfeld

The Killing Chase – Craig Hurren

The Winter People – Jennifer McMahon

Dare Me – Megan Abbott

In the Company of Educated Men – Leonce Gaiter

The Stupidest Angel – Christopher Moore

Blue Wicked –Alan Jones

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Get Lara’s Top Pick of 2013 ‘Beautiful Ruins’ eBook for $3.99

beautiful ruinsHappy New Year! And what better way to start off the new year than with a great deal on a great read?

If you haven’t seen my list of Top Picks of 2013, check it out now. Scroll down, and you’ll notice my third favorite read of the year was Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter.

An epic story about two lost young people who find each other again much later in life will make you laugh and cry. It’s a truly lovely book. And now the ebook for Kindle is available for just $3.99. Trust me — it’s not a bad way to spend $4.

Get it on your Kindle now for just $3.99.

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Lara’s Top Picks of 2013

booksWith three days left in 2013, there are “Best Of” lists galore. The New York Times has already written up its 100 Notable Books of 2013 list, and it is a good list to go by. Each December, I skim it to determine which books I’ll read the following year — hopefully.

But every year, I like to put together my own list. I haven’t read as many books this year as I usually do, but I’ve made it a point to read a few that I’ve been wanting to read for years. That said, this is my annual list of my top picks from 2013. Mind you, these are not all books that came out this year. In fact, most of them didn’t come out this year. This is a selection of the best books I’ve read this year. The publication and release dates are irrelevant to me. For instance, my favorite book last year was The Imperfectionists by Tom Rachman, which was actually published in 2010. The year before that, my favorite was The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton. A good book is a good book, no matter the year.

So enjoy my list, and read on for a complete list of all the books I’ve read in 2013!

10. Sisterhood Everlasting by Ann Brashares. The final book in The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants series, Sisterhood Everlasting is an honest look at modern-day female friendship — how easy it is to drift apart and how wonderful it can be when friends reunite. It takes tragedy to bring these best friends together again, but isn’t that often — yet sadly — how friendships reignite? Buy it now.

9. Teacher Man by Frank McCourt. Bestselling memoirist Frank McCourt takes us through his journey as a teacher, the profession he pursued for 30 years before writing about his life. His memoir is full of anecdotes and writing lessons from the classroom, but more importantly lessons about life, love, and the people you meet along the way. Buy it now.

8. The House Girl by Tara Conklin.  The lives of two women from two very different times intersect when a lawyer working on a class-action suit about slavery begins to research a slave from the 1800’s. In learning about the lawyer, we also learn about a slave named Josephine, and her quest for freedom. The hunt for Josephine’s possible descendents leaves the reader wondering if either woman ever win her uphill battle. Buy it now.

7. The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Gailbraith (J.K. Rowling). This bestselling novel made the news when it was revealed that the author, Robert Gailbraith, was actually a pseudonym for the bestselling author of the Harry Potter series J.K. Rowling. But her crime/mystery novel, The Cuckoo’s Calling, is a great read in its own right. The page-turning story about the mysterious death of a model makes a social statement about our fame-obsessed society. Buy it now.

6. Where’d You Go, Bernadette? by Maria Semple. A little girl sets out to find her crazy mother Bernadette in this scatterbrained dark comedy. The story is told out of order, and along the way, we learn more and more about each character. In the end, finding Bernadette isn’t the best part of the book. Searching for her and learning about her is way more fun. Buy it now.

5. Inferno by Dan Brown. Bestselling author Dan Brown has done it again. The latest Robert Langdon adventure (Angels and Demons, The Da Vinci Code, The Lost Symbol) takes us through Florence and Venice as Langdon works to solve yet another world-saving puzzle. But Brown’s Inferno begins with Langdon already in Florence, suffering from a gun shot wound and two days worth of amnesia. Langdon now must solve two puzzles — the one he’s been given and the one within his own mind. Buy it now.

4. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky. This coming-of-age novel about a lost soul in the ninth grade is a modern-day Catcher in the Rye. The book is full of letters that the coy, yet observant Charlie is writing to an unknown friend about his freshman year. Charlie must learn to deal with his first love, new friends, lost friends, best friends, family, drugs, and alcohol, all while keeping a dark secret. Buy it now.

3. Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter. An Italian man seeks out a Hollywood producer in order to find his long-lost love from 1962 — an actress with a dark past. But the two men dislike each other, and neither knows whatever happened to Dee Moray. However, the reader does. Beautiful Ruins is a smart, truly lovely book that flips back and forth between different characters and different decades, ultimately proving true love exists. Buy it now.

2. Ready Player One by Ernest Cline. Whether or not you’re a fan of video games or the 80’s, you can’t help but enjoy this fantastically fun bestselling novel about a boy who plays a life-consuming video game in order to win a fortune. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory meets 1984, this coming-of-age quest story says a lot about our technology-consumed world, while including as many pop culture references as you can imagine. Buy it now.

1. Maine by Courtney J. Sullivan. I read this book a few months ago, but my heart still feels a pang whenever I think about it. Maine tells a beautiful, deep story of four generations of relatives, all women forced to spend a few weeks together in their family summer home in Maine. Between the secrets and complicated female relationships forced together by blood and obligation, there is love. It just takes some time to find it. Buy it now.

The Vow: The Kim and Krickett Carpenter Story – Kim Carpenter

The House Girl – Tara Conklin

Sisterhood Everlasting – Ann Brashares

Ophelia Speaks: Adolescent Girls Write About Their Search for Self – Sara Shandler

The Eye-Dancers – Michael S. Fedison

Girls in White Dresses – Jennifer Close

The Mobius Strip of Ifs – Mathias B. Freese

The Oracle Code – Charles Brokaw

Girl Unmoored – Jennifer Gooch Hummer

Sarah’s Key – Tatiana de Rosnay

The Killing Code – Craig Hurren

Ready Player One – Ernest Cline

Maine – Courtney J. Sullivan

I’d Know You Anywhere – Laura Lippman

Rome for Beginners – Fiona Coughlin

Then Came You – Jennifer Weiner

The Cuckoo’s Calling – Robert Gailbraith (J.K. Rowling)

Ways of Leaving – Grant Jarrett

The Best of Me – Nicholas Sparks

Losing It All – M.R. Cornelius

Teacher Man – Frank McCourt

Where’d You Go, Bernadette? – Maria Semple

Beautiful Ruins – Jess Walter

The Perks of Being a Wallflower – Stephen Chbosky

Inferno – Dan Brown


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Lara’s Top Picks of 2012

It’s that time of year, which means The New York Times has released its 100 Notable Books of 2012 list. So I figured it’s time for me to post my top picks of 2012.

I said this last year, and I’ll say it again; I tend to be a bit behind in reading big bestsellers. I usually keep track of all the books I want to read, and just kind of…get around to reading them when I can. That being said, this is a list of the best books I read this year, not the best books that came out this year. For instance, last year my number one pick for the year was Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence.

So, enjoy my list of the best 10 books I read this year, and keep reading on for the complete list of books I read in 2012.

10. Fifty Shades of Grey by E.L. James. The sexy book that took the world by storm, Fifty Shades is most certainly not well-written, nor is it particularly original. (It did begin as Twilight fan fiction after all.) But all that dirty loving between a young girl and a rich, older man made women unashamed to bask in the glory of sex. That’s quite an accomplishment for a silly old book. Get it now.

9. Bossypants by Tina Fey. We all know Tina Fey for her role on 30 Rock, her performances on SNL, and her comedic writing of Mean Girls. But until she released her bestselling memoir Bossypants, the world never knew quite so much about her, and as it turns out, she’s just as funny in real life as she is on TV. Get it now.

8. Fifth Avenue, 5 a.m. by Sam Wasson. This nonfiction look into the making of Breakfast at Tiffany’s not only explicitly explains the behind-the-scenes drama of the old-time classic, but it also details the troubles and talents of Audrey Hepburn, and how this one huge role in cinematic history changed women forever. Get it now.

7. A Mother’s Song by Michael Finaghty. A journey around the world, a journey to find yourself, and a journey to find peace, love and happiness, A Mother’s Song tells the beautiful story of an Australian adopted girl on the quest to locate her birth mother and follow her dreams. This is a story about relationships and deep bonds that last. Get it now for just $1.99.

6. The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides. This is a bestselling tale of one girl and the two boys she meets and falls in love with — in different ways — in college. Despite the title, however, this is not a love story. It’s a coming-of-age novel about college and the post-grad years, mixed in with sometimes annoying, but mostly powerful and important nods to literary classics. Get it now.

5. Still Alice by Lisa Genova. Alzheimer’s Disease is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, but people not directly affected by it may not realize how much Alzheimer’s can impact an entire family. Still Alice portrays a fictional, but very realistic story about a woman diagnosed at the ripe age of 50 — a devastating diagnosis for her grown children, her husband, and her career. Get it now.

4. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. It’s an American classic, with good reason. Jay Gatsby is a man who’s financially wealthy but romantically poor. He throws lavish parties at his Long Island estate in the 1920’s, but when he briefly wins back his former love, Daisy, relationships unravel and things get out of hand — a sign that it almost always comes down to love or money. Get it now.

3. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn. Another huge bestseller that soared this year, this is a haunting tale about a couple who’s marriage has gone sour, and ends in murder. Nick’s wife, Amy, has disappeared, leaving a small Southern town to basically convict Nick of murder. A stunning twist midway through the book suddenly makes the story deeply disturbing, as if it weren’t already. Get it now.

2. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern. Any love story involves two people playing games, but you’ve seen nothing until you’ve read bestseller The Night Circus. Two magicians, Celia and Marco, are raised to fight each other in an ongoing magic war, but love casts another spell on these two, and they must figure out a way to play for survival. Get it now.

1. The Imperfectionists by Tom Rachman. The newspaper industry is a dying one, but the people who work for this international newspaper are very much alive — alive with stories of love, sadness, and crushed dreams. The Imperfectionists intertwines the stories of 10 different employees — and a reader — at an European-based newspaper. In each chapter, we read about another employee but the overarching story is about the paper — a powerful statement on the current state of journalism and society. Get it now.

And alas, here’s the complete list of books I read in 2012.

The Imperfectionists – Tom Rachman

Room – Emma Donaghue

The Tiger’s Wife – Tea Obreht

Nights in Rodanthe – Nicholas Sparks

The Hunger But Mainly Death Games – John Bailey Owen

Sing You Home – Jodi Picoult
The Reader – Bernhard Schlink

Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte

The Long Hello – Cathie Borrie

Looking Into Your Voice – Cathie Borrie

The Alchemist – Paolo Coelho

A Mother’s Song – Michael Finaghty

The Eclipse of Mrs. Moon – Virginia Galfo

Memoirs of Normalcy – Joleene DesRosiers Moody

Reservation Road – John Burnham Schwartz

Bossypants – Tina Fey

Tribes of Time – Jaymes E. Terry

Fifty Shades of Grey – E.L. James

Snow Flower and the Secret Fan – Lisa See

The Tipping Point – Malcolm Gladwell

Fifty Shades Darker – E.L. James

A Horrible Man – Leonie Wallace

The Last Song – Nicholas Sparks

The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald

Perfect Skin – Nick Earls

Have a Little Faith – Mitch Albom

Deuce Delaney – Michael Murray

Fifty Shades Freed – E.L. James

My Story My Song – Luciminaria Roberts

The Night Circus – Erin Morganstern

The Marriage Plot – Jeffrey Eugenides

The Boy in the Suitcase – Lene Kaaberbol and Agnete Friis

Still Alice – Lisa Genova

Fifth Avenue, 5 a.m.: Audrey Hepburn, ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’ and the Dawn of the Modern Woman – Sam Wasson

Gone Girl – Gillian Flynn

How to Rule the World – Jade Heasley

The Art of Fielding – Chad Harbach

Beyond Parallel – Matthew Turner


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