Tag Archives: classic

Unpublished J.D. Salinger Stories Leaked

J.D. Salinger died about four years ago, but just like Tupac and Michael Jackson, lots of his work is getting traction posthumously.

According to Entertainment Weekly, the author best known for his classic novel Catcher in the Rye had a number of short stories leaked not too long ago. Salinger’s stories, “The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls,” “Paula,” and “Birthday Boy” were traced to an eBay auction that ended in September. The previously unpublished stories were sold for a mere 67 pounds ($110).

Before the leak, “The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls” was only available at Princeton University. The other stories were available at University of Texas’ Harry Ransom Center.

Through an agreement with Princeton University, “The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls” was not meant to be published until 2060, 50 years after J.D. Salinger’s death. The story was originally published in Harper’s Bazaar and is thought to be a sort of prequel to the beloved Catcher in the Rye.

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‘Mockingbird’ Author Harper Lee Settles Copyright Lawsuit

The story of To Kill a Mockingbird author Harper Lee’s copyright lawsuit has come to an end. As I earlier reported, Harper Lee filed a lawsuit against her former agent’s son-in-law, for not properly protecting the copyright of To Kill a Mockingbird.

According to Entertainment Weekly, the author and the defendants in the case have reached an agreement. The details of the settlement are still unclear, but a court filing regarding the case was dismissed last week.

There you have it — drama-free Harper Lee. I wonder if recent talk about the lawsuit helped boost sales?

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Get ‘Anna Karenina’ with Movie Tie-In for $8.98, down from $12.95 or on Kindle for $7.99

It’s a Russian love story classic. So it’s only natural that it would be converted into a movie. The surprise here is that it’s taken moviemakers this long to finally getting around to putting Anna Karenina on the big screen. But alas, it has arrived, and now there’s talk of the movie winning Oscar gold. Combine Keira Knightley, a movie based on a book, and a period piece into one movie, and Oscar gold is inevitable.

Now’s your chance to read Leo Tolstoy’s book about 19th-century doomed love with a movie tie-in, to boot.

Get it now in paperback for only $8.98, down from $12.95.

Or get it on your Kindle for just $7.99.

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Review: The Age of Innocence

Recap: New York City in the 1870’s is nothing like the Manhattan we know today. And that’s what Edith Wharton shows us in her Pulitzer Prize winning novel The Age of Innocence. An American fiction classic, The Age of Innocence tells the story of Newland Archer, an upstanding New York lawyer who comes from a family of wealth and aristocracy. Archer is set to marry the lovely, fair, and innocent May Welland. But when May’s “foreign” cousin Madame Ellen Olenska returns to New York after her marriage fails in Europe, things get complicated.

Because Ellen Olesnka wants a divorce, she is black-labeled as the scandalous member of the family. On top of that, her time spent in Europe makes her “different” from the other women in New York. While most are embarrassed by her, Archer is intrigued. Their relationship quickly falls into the realm of flirtation when he is asked to deal with her divorce. But because divorce is so vehemently frowned upon, he encourages her to stay married to her husband but to continue living away from him in New York.

As their relationship progresses, so does Archer’s insistence that May move up the date of their wedding. In 19th century New York, the only thing people discuss more than divorce is an affair, thereby making Newland Archer, Ellen Olenska, and May Welland the talk of the town.

Analysis: The Age of Innocence is a classic story of expectation versus desire, and this is mostly due to the setting of the novel. In 1870’s New York, there are certain things that are expected from members of the high society. For instance, marriage, children, trips to Europe and the opera, and dinner parties. But Archer’s relationship with Madame Olenska opens his eyes to a world where people make decisions based on what they feel, rather than what they’re expected to do.

Madame Olenska is the woman he most obviously loves. He admires her strength, beauty, and passion. But May represents what’s expected of him: a nice New York girl who’s beautiful, has done no wrong and comes from a good family. As tempted as he is, the story does not turn out the way a modern day love triangle story would. In that period of American history, avoiding scandal was a priority.

So it seems that the story’s setting itself is its own character in the novel. The time and place directly control the characters’ actions. But because we live in modern times, it also makes the story suspenseful, thrilling, and above all, romantic, in the most heartbreaking of ways.

MVP: Madame Olenska. She’s the only character in the novel who truly shows strength and bravery. Yes, she’s “different” from the other New York women, but it’s because she’s willing to stand up for herself by getting out of a bad marriage and befriending those who she legitimately likes, rather than those who come from good family backgrounds. She speak her mind, when everyone else’s mouths and minds stay shut.

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CliffsNotes Comes to the Web…In Video Form

In case you ever wanted to see a classic book or Shakespeare played out in cartoon form, you can now. That’s right. CliffsNotes is coming to the web.

According to this article from Entertainment Weekly, Producer Mark Burnett has teamed up with CliffsNotes, AOL, and Coalition Films to create web videos of all the classic novels and plays, mostly read by high school and college students.

Producers say they don’t want to replace the books by any means. But for the students who won’t read the books anyway and already plan to read the CliffsNotes, now they can just watch them instead. Not to mention, they’ll also be funny, which could pull people in more than the original book might. Stephan Lee explains.

Burnett got involved in the project after seeing a need for this sort of content. “There’s no question that there’s no replacement for reading the actual books,” he told EW. “But kids do use CliffsNotes worldwide, no question about it. It amazed me that there was no digital version of these CliffsNotes.” In addition to being quick and informative, the series aims to engage its audience with humor.

Only six Shakespearean plays are currently available, including Romeo & Juliet, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, Julius Caesar, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. But Burnett hopes to eventually have hundreds of shorts on his site.

I can’t decide if I think this is good for the industry — because more people will likely learn the stories — or bad — because they won’t be reading the originals. What do you guys think?

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