Tag Archives: Divergent

New Duology Coming from Veronica Roth

carvethemarkNow that the Divergent series has concluded and the movies are almost complete, bestselling author Veronica Roth is set to release a new series.

According to Entertainment Weekly, this one is a duology. Carve the Mark is due to be released January 17, 2017. The first book in the duology, Carve centers around a galaxy where “some are favored by fate [and] everyone develops a currentgift, a unique power meant to shape the future.” Sound familiar? Yes, it sounds very similar to the faction system of the Divergent books. Especially the further explanation that the two main characters’ gifts “make them vulnerable to others’ control.”

Since the final book in the Divergent series (Allegiant) is often regarded as the worst of the series, I wonder if Roth’s writing of a similarly themed series might be her way of redeeming herself, since here, she’d be able to write a more satisfying ending than that of the Divergent series.

Either way, it’s sure to be a hit, since her first YA series clearly put her on the map, and writing a two-story series may work in her favor, considering how rundown the YA scope is with trilogies.

 

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Movie vs. Book: Allegiant

allegiant-by-veronica-roth**Spoiler Alert: this is your warning that if you have not read the actual book, you might not want to read the following review. Spoilers are included. 

Let me start by saying this: Before seeing Allegiant in theaters, I was not aware that producers decided to split final book in the Divergent series into two movies. So naturally, I was shocked at the state in which the movie ended — clearly setting it up for a fourth movie. That said, the movie adaptation of the final novel in the Divergent series was terrible.

Allegiant is one hell of a book. I was skeptical when I started reading it since I was told by many that the third book in the series was the worst because of something Tris does. Her self-sacrifice in the novel’s third act was a bold move by author Veronica Roth, no doubt. So it’s understandable that readers — especially YA readers that the book targets — would be upset by the dark, sad ending. But I found her actions to be brave and powerful — those of a true tragic hero, sacrificing herself for the greater good, despite the dangers that lie in her wake.

In addition to that, the multiple rebellions and serums in the novel make Allegiant sometimes confusing, but mostly exciting and overwhelming in the best way. For the first time, parts of the novel are told through Four/Tobias’s voice instead of solely Tris’s, and he faces his own dark plot line. Both their stories move with power.

While the Insurgent movie changed some things from the book, the Allegiant movie changed almost everything. In fact, I wouldn’t even call it an adaptation, but rather a movie “loosely based” on the novel by Veronica Roth.

To start, characters Cara and Uriah are cut from the movie, which thereby means the entire “Four accidentally putting Uriah in a coma because of the explosion he helped plan against the bureau” storyline is cut from the movie. That is a huge part of the novel, so it was extremely disappointing to see it  left out of the movie. The movie also made the bureau headquarters much more futuristic than the raggedy image that’s portrayed in the book. The movie also makes it seem like it was Tris’s idea to form the Allegiant, when it’s actually Johanna’s idea — a device to make Tris even more heroic, I imagine.

The movie also adds things the book doesn’t include. For instance: Tobias’s father receiving the memory serum; Four participating in a group that helps bring children from the fringe back to the bureau; a head council to which David must report; and the characters having jobs and duties within the bureau. Some of these changes may seem minor, but because of them, other plot lines and character motivations in the movie had to be adapted, and suddenly it was hard to tell where the story was going since it veered so off course from the novel.

It’s a shame the Divergent movies have increasingly gotten worse and are now out of touch with the great novels upon which they’re based. But if this weekend’s poor ticket sales are any indication, maybe producers won’t make Allegiant Part Two after all and save us the disappointment.

Get Allegiant in paperback for $7.92. 

Or on your Kindle for $9.99.

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Movie vs. Book: Insurgent

**Spoiler Alert: Because of the popularity of both this book and movie, this review does include spoilers. 

Insurgent picks up where author Veronica Roth’s Divergent left off — with Tris, Four, Caleb, Peter and Marcus living in the Amity faction, waiting to decide their next move after narrowly escaping the attempted takeover and attack lead by Jeanine. Tris is still reeling from the death of her parents, and tensions continue to run high between Four and Tris and Peter. But when Erudite and Dauntless traitors arrive to search for Abnegation, Tris, Four and Caleb escape and meet up with the Factionless. After that, all hell breaks loose as factions try to combine to either fight off or fight for Jeanine and whatever plans she has. But Tris learns Jeanine has an important secret that involves her parents — one that she must find while also protecting the lives on the innocent.

That general story holds true in the movie version of the bestselling novel. That said, I have never seen a movie that veers so differently from the novel upon which it’s based. First of all, the movie leaves out Marcus almost entirely. As Four’s father, Marcus is the one from whom Tris learns how important her parents’ secret is. Much of the book involves Tris backing Marcus and working to get her hands on that information — a move that causes some friction between Tris and Four. But with Marcus barely in the movie, all of that friction is gone.

Not to mention, the movie objectifies that secret into a box, which Jeanine is working hard to unlock. It seems like we’re to believe that Jeanine doesn’t know what the secret is and needs a Divergent to open it by passing simulations for all five factions. In the book, Jeanine does make Tris do simulations, but it’s not to unlock a box of secrets. In the book, the reason is so she can figure out a serum that will actually affect Divergents.

The way the secret comes out is completely different in the movie than In the book. In the book, Jeanine has the secret information hidden on her computer. The information is accessed near the end of the novel as part a team effort between Tris, Christina, Marcus and several others infiltrating Jeanine’s facility and computer. But that entire section is left out of the movie.

On top of all this, three of the four major deaths in the book are either left out or changed in the movie. Lynn’s death is left out entirely. Four kills Eric in both, but in the book, Eric is put on trial and then killed. There is no trial or Dauntless leaders in the movie. Then there’s Jeanine’s death.  In the book, Tori kills her, despite Tris trying to fight Tori on it. But in the movie, Evelyn kills Jeanine, with no fight from anyone.

These are just the major changes. There are lots of other minor ones. Not having read the third book in the series, Allegiant, it’s hard for me to determine if and how these changes may affect the third movie. And granted, the movie was still excellent, action-packed and exciting. But it was so different from the book, I found myself having a hard time cheering at the end.

Get Insurgent in paperback for $10.68.

Or on your Kindle for $3.99.

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‘Divergent’ Author Signs New Book Deal

Now that the Divergent series is good and done, the books’ author Veronica Roth is starting on a new project.

According to Entertainment Weekly, Roth has signed a two-book deal with HarperCollins. The series’ books are expected to be released in 2017 and 2018. We don’t know much right now about what the books will be about. What we do know is that it will follow a boy’s “unlikely alliance” with an enemy. Apparently her idea for the series started initially with the character, and the rest came afterwards.

I don’t know about you, but as a big fan of the Divergent series, I’m excited to see what else Veronica Roth has up her sleeve!

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Movie vs. Book: Divergent

divergentContributed by Alison Kurtzman

One choice can transform you.

Divergent tells the story of Beatrice “Tris” Prior, a sixteen-year-old living in post-apocalyptic Chicago. In this reality, from birth until the age of sixteen, children live with their parents in one of five factions, including Amity – the peaceful; Candor – the honest; Erudite – the knowledgeable; Dauntless – the brave; and Abnegation – the selfless.  Both the story and book begin with Tris expressing trepidation about her upcoming Tris’ simulation test, which will decide what faction she belongs to. Tris is placed in Abnegation,with her parents and brother, Caleb, but feels that she is not selfless enough to belong.

Despite her concerns, she arrives at her test and drinks the serum, which brings her into mental scenarios to help place her. Tris wakes up expecting a result that will calm her, but instead is told the test didn’t work on her. She’s Divergent, meaning her mind works differently from others, and that she is in danger. Jeanne, the Erudite leader, is leading a hunt to get rid of all Divergents. In order to help her, her tester manually enters an Abnegation test result, and warns Tris to choose carefully at the choosing ceremony.

Tris chooses to join Dauntless, leaving behind her parents, and brother, who chooses Erudite. In Dauntless, Tris meets Four, the handsome, recruit trainer and a mutual crush develops quickly. Tris becomes friends with three other Dauntless transfers: Christina, Will, and Al, while making enemies with Peter, Molly, and Drew, the other transfers. With the help of Four, Tris must navigate the grueling Dauntless initiation, all while keeping her secret. When Jeanne finds out about Tris’ divergence, she’s forced into a fight to save herself and her loved ones.

The film version of Divergent was well-done. It stayed fairly close to the book’s plot and didn’t change too much. However, I believe they made a few deadly errors. Firstly, Tris’ relationship with her family was not fleshed out as much as it should have been. Her loyalty to her family and regret for leaving isn’t well explained in the movie, and I think that lessens the importance of a major plot point.

Additionally, while it is explained that Peter, Tris’ initiate rival, is mean and threatens her, he is much more evil in the book. There is an important moment in which Peter physically attacks one of the other initiates, forcing him to drop out of initiation due to his injury. This section was not in the film, and needed to be. While it is gruesome, it establishes Peter’s personality and loyalty – something very important both in the end, and, even more importantly, in the next two books.

While there were not many major plot changes in the film, I think the changes that were made, were poor decisions. It may have helped the film’s flow,  but it will impact the audience’s understanding and feelings for the characters and plot in the next two parts of the Divergent series. My recommendation would be see the movie, but read the series as well, so you get the full story.

Get Divergent in paperback for $5.49.

Or on your Kindle for $4.99.

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