Tag Archives: New York

Review: A Race Like No Other

aracelikenoothercoverRecap: For some, it’s about running for those who can’t. For others, it’s about pushing through all levels of pain. For some, it’s for the vanity. But for all, running a marathon is about proving something to themselves. For those running the New York City Marathon, it’s about doing it on the biggest stage possible.¬†New York Times¬†sports reporter Liz Robbins captures the magic of the New York City Marathon — the diligent training of the athletes both professional and amateur, the difficult 26.2-mile course through the streets of all five boroughs of New York, the unity and generosity of the crowds pushing the athletes along, and the emotional turmoil and inner workings of the runners. Each has a story.

Robbins weaves together¬† the stories of those who ran the race in 2007. She tells the stories of the professional athletes, including their race history and personal lives and why they’re each hoping to win this race. She also shares the story of an alcoholic woman recently released from jail, hoping to reconnect with her family. She tells the story of a college graduate diagnosed with a rare form of cancer whose brother urged him to run. She also tells the stories of the non-runners — the choir and band leaders who let their players play at certain mile markers every year, the Polish bakers who hand out brownies along the course, the men who paint the blue line of the course leading up to race day. Because when it comes to the New York City Marathon, the crowds are as a vital a player as the runners.

Analysis: Where the New York City Marathon connects everyone in the city that day, Liz Robbins connects all runners everywhere with this detailed, inspiring read about the biggest race in the world. Each chapter details a different mile in the race, and Robbins magically transports us to each and every road, bridge and water station with her writing. You can practically taste the sweat of the runners. She makes it clear that the 26.2 miles run in just over two hours by a professional athlete is same 26.2 miles run by the amateurs who finish in more than five hours. Each mile is beautiful in its own way, whether it be filled with pain, filled with joy, filled with emotion or filled with surprises.

Her ability to take you to mile 17, for instance, and then to Kenya where the professionals train or to mile 20 and then to the hospital where the cancer patient is battling illness to get out and run is seamless. The stories are non-fiction, but they are spell-binding and powerful. Ending with the finish times and mini-epilogues of each runner she’s followed throughout the book will you as breathless as — dare I say it? — a marathon.

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Review: The Age of Innocence

Recap: New York City in the 1870’s is nothing like the Manhattan we know today. And that’s what Edith Wharton shows us in her Pulitzer Prize winning novel The Age of Innocence. An American fiction classic, The Age of Innocence tells the story of Newland Archer, an upstanding New York lawyer who comes from a family of wealth and aristocracy. Archer is set to marry the lovely, fair, and innocent May Welland. But when May’s “foreign” cousin Madame Ellen Olenska returns to New York after her marriage fails in Europe, things get complicated.

Because Ellen Olesnka wants a divorce, she is black-labeled as the scandalous member of the family. On top of that, her time spent in Europe makes her “different” from the other women in New York. While most are embarrassed by her, Archer is intrigued. Their relationship quickly falls into the realm of flirtation when he is asked to deal with her divorce. But because divorce is so vehemently frowned upon, he encourages her to stay married to her husband but to continue living away from him in New York.

As their relationship progresses, so does Archer’s insistence that May move up the date of their wedding. In 19th century New York, the only thing people discuss more than divorce is an affair, thereby making Newland Archer, Ellen Olenska, and May Welland the talk of the town.

Analysis: The Age of Innocence is a classic story of expectation versus desire, and this is mostly due to the setting of the novel. In 1870’s New York, there are certain things that are expected from members of the high society. For instance, marriage, children, trips to Europe and the opera, and dinner parties. But Archer’s relationship with Madame Olenska opens his eyes to a world where people make decisions based on what they feel, rather than what they’re expected to do.

Madame Olenska is the woman he most obviously loves. He admires her strength, beauty, and passion. But May represents what’s expected of him: a nice New York girl who’s beautiful, has done no wrong and comes from a good family. As tempted as he is, the story does not turn out the way a modern day love triangle story would. In that period of American history, avoiding scandal was a priority.

So it seems that the story’s setting itself is its own character in the novel. The time and place directly control the characters’ actions. But because we live in modern times, it also makes the story suspenseful, thrilling, and above all, romantic, in the most heartbreaking of ways.

MVP: Madame Olenska. She’s the only character in the novel who truly shows strength and bravery. Yes, she’s “different” from the other New York women, but it’s because she’s willing to stand up for herself by getting out of a bad marriage and befriending those who she legitimately likes, rather than those who come from good family backgrounds. She speak her mind, when everyone else’s mouths and minds stay shut.

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