Tag Archives: parody

Goldman Sachs Parody Book Gets New Publisher

gselevatorA little more back and forth about that Goldman Sachs Twitter feed turned book deal — the book is back on!

Last week, I reported that after having gotten a book deal with Simon & Schuster imprint Touchstone, the Straight to Hell: True Tales of Deviance and Excess in the World of Investment Banking author had lost the deal since he never actually worked for Goldman Sachs.

But according to The New York Times, author John LeFevre got a new publishing deal, this time with Grove Atlantic, an independent publishing house. Plans for the book remain virtually the same; the book will be based on the Twitter account @GSElevator, a parody account that includes dark, harsh, but funny tweets supposedly overheard in the elevators at Goldman Sachs, one of the biggest investment banking firms in the world.

LeFevre, who until now had remained anonymous, received a six-figure advance from Grove Atlantic. Publishers promise the book will be strictly marketed as a work of fiction — again, because he never worked for Goldman Sachs. (He worked for Citigroup.) The book is due to be released in November.

Sounds like it’s hard to say no to this wolf of Wall Street!

Leave a comment

Filed under News Articles

Goldman Sachs Parody Book Cancelled

Just as I was about to write this fabulous post about the seemingly funny and great book due out this fall, I learned that plans for it had been cancelled.

According to Time, the  book based on the parody Twitter account @GSElevator will no longer released. This comes after the publisher learned that the writer of the Twitter account never actually worked for Goldman Sachs, the company that the tweets are based on.

@GSElevator is a parody account that includes dark, harsh, but funny tweets supposedly overheard in the elevators at Goldman Sachs, one of the biggest investment banking firms in the world. The account has more than 600,000 followers.

Entitled Straight to Hell: True Tales of Deviance and Excess in the World of Investment Banking, the book was expected to “go beyond” the “over-the-top behavior that has become associated with big Wall Street banks”  described in the @GSElevator tweets.

1 Comment

Filed under News Articles

Review: The Hunger But Mainly Death Games

Recap: In a post-apocalyptic world, only one girl stands the chance to win the epic teen death battle against 23 other opponents: Bratniss Everclean. The Hunger But Mainly Death Games is a witty, ridiculous take on the popular Suzanne Collins trilogy The Hunger Games. Instead of Katniss Everdeen, the story follows Bratniss Everclean. While the overall story is basically the same — teenagers fighting each other to death in a nationally-televised event — the parodied version goes to new extremes.

For instance, the fighters kill each other through cannibalism, defecation, and strangulation with intestines. The book is at times grotesque and disturbing. The author seems to have some kind of obsession with defecation throughout the book. The characters often don’t shower, live in garbage, and eat moldy mayonnaise.

But there are other components of the story that are rather brilliant, such as its breaking of the fourth wall, its self-aware quality, and its jokes about young adult teen novels in general — not to mention cracks at Harry Potter and Twilight. It also uses very current pop culture references to make cheap, but hysterical jokes.

Analysis: To be honest, the potty humor and violence throughout the book was too much for me. Though it was funny, it was disgusting. But I also appreciated it in that it was the author’s way of pointing out how ridiculous the actual Hunger Games story is, when you really think about it.

But the highlights were the book’s references to other popular young adult fiction. For instance, the character Hagridmitch. He’s the parodied version of Katniss’s Hunger Games trainer Haymitch, but he’s actually Hagrid from Harry Potter. Somehow stuck in the wrong young adult teen novel, he constantly refers to Bratniss as Hermoine, talking about Harry and dragons. That is, until Oofie (the parodied Effie) stops him to avoid copyright problems. Hagridmitch appears throughout the book and almost always had me laughing. There’s also a scene that references Twilight author Stephenie Meyer in the most hilarious way.

The book also takes jabs at young adult fiction in general — like its emphasis on love stories — in The Hunger But Mainly Death Games, Pita (the parodied Peeta) is a crazy stalker, the popular use of first-person narration and the often ludicrous decisions made by the main characters.

Some fans of The Hunger Games may not like the book. The Hunger But Mainly Death Games, as I said, points out some of the ridiculous aspects of the original novel and obviously, makes fun of it. Some may also not enjoy the level of grotesque jokes. But overall, it’s a funny, quick read that’s sure to make you laugh at least a few times, whether you’re a fan of The Hunger Games or not.

MVP: Hagridmitch, without a doubt. The author was brilliant to include this character that serves as a metamorphosis of Hagrid and Haymitch. After all, the two characters serve virtually the same purposes in both teen series. Hagridmitch was consistently the funniest character in the book, and in a parody, that’s a perfect character.

Get The Hunger But Mainly Death Games now for just $7.79.

And get the e-book for just $0.99!

2 Comments

Filed under Reviews

Children’s Book Parody Has Us Saying ‘Goodnight’ To Electronics

Try to think back to some of the books you read growing up. There was Green Eggs and Ham, The Very Hungry Caterpillar, The Runaway Bunny, and of course Goodnight Moon. But Goodnight Moon will never be the same.

The book has gotten an update, thanks to children’s author David Milgrim. Milgrim recently published a new, modernized version of the famous children’s book. It’s called Goodnight iPad. According to this article by The New York Times, Milgrim — who cleverly wrote the book under the pseudonym, Ann Droyd — says it’s a satirical look at the way electronics have changed the way we live our lives. He explains.

“The thing that really inspired me about the idea was my fascination with how much things have changed since the world depicted in ‘Goodnight Moon,’ ” Mr. Milgrim said. “Our homes are really nothing like that anymore. The contrast between that quiet book and our noisy, buzzing lives seemed ripe for exploration and humor.”

The book was released in October 2011, and more than 120,000 have been published so far. It’s a sleeper hit, and I’m not surprised. What a smart, funny way to freshen up an old classic. What do you guys think?
Get Goodnight iPad in hardcover for just $10.

1 Comment

Filed under News Articles