Tag Archives: pseudonym

J.K. Rowling’s Detective Series to Be Adapted into TV Series

Harry Potter may not be coming back to the big screen — or any screen — time soon, but J.K. Rowling’s other novels are soon expected to make their TV debut.

According to Entertainment Weekly, the BBC has announced it will adapt J.K. Rowling’s Cormoran Strike novels into a BBC One TV series. The detective series was written under Rowling’s pseudonym Robert Galbraith. The TV show will start with the telling of the first novel in the series, The Cuckoo’s Calling, which was published last year. Rowling will be involved in the project, working with BBC and Bronte Film and TV. So far only two novels in the series have been published — The Cuckoo’s Calling and The Silkworm. A date for the TV series has not yet been announced.

But Bronte Film and TV is also helping Rowling adapt her other adult fiction novel, The Casual Vacancy, into a three-part series that will air on BBC One in February 2015. The Casual Vacancy is not part of the Cormoran Strike Series.

So…who will be watching?? Considering how much I loved The Cuckoo’s Calling, I know I will!

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Goldman Sachs Parody Book Gets New Publisher

gselevatorA little more back and forth about that Goldman Sachs Twitter feed turned book deal — the book is back on!

Last week, I reported that after having gotten a book deal with Simon & Schuster imprint Touchstone, the Straight to Hell: True Tales of Deviance and Excess in the World of Investment Banking author had lost the deal since he never actually worked for Goldman Sachs.

But according to The New York Times, author John LeFevre got a new publishing deal, this time with Grove Atlantic, an independent publishing house. Plans for the book remain virtually the same; the book will be based on the Twitter account @GSElevator, a parody account that includes dark, harsh, but funny tweets supposedly overheard in the elevators at Goldman Sachs, one of the biggest investment banking firms in the world.

LeFevre, who until now had remained anonymous, received a six-figure advance from Grove Atlantic. Publishers promise the book will be strictly marketed as a work of fiction — again, because he never worked for Goldman Sachs. (He worked for Citigroup.) The book is due to be released in November.

Sounds like it’s hard to say no to this wolf of Wall Street!

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Goldman Sachs Parody Book Cancelled

Just as I was about to write this fabulous post about the seemingly funny and great book due out this fall, I learned that plans for it had been cancelled.

According to Time, the  book based on the parody Twitter account @GSElevator will no longer released. This comes after the publisher learned that the writer of the Twitter account never actually worked for Goldman Sachs, the company that the tweets are based on.

@GSElevator is a parody account that includes dark, harsh, but funny tweets supposedly overheard in the elevators at Goldman Sachs, one of the biggest investment banking firms in the world. The account has more than 600,000 followers.

Entitled Straight to Hell: True Tales of Deviance and Excess in the World of Investment Banking, the book was expected to “go beyond” the “over-the-top behavior that has become associated with big Wall Street banks”  described in the @GSElevator tweets.

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Lawyer Fined for Leaking that Pseudonymous Author was J.K. Rowling

rowlingIf the man who leaked information about J.K. Rowling being the true author of this year’s crime novel The Cuckoo’s Calling thought he was in the clear, he thought wrong.

According to The Chicago Tribune, lawyer Chris Gossage has been fined 1000 pounds ($1650) and has received a warning for revealing that bestselling Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling was the true author of The Cuckoo’s Calling. The novel was released under the pseudonym Robert Gailbraith.

Gossage is a partner in the firm Russells Solicitors, which represented Rowling. He apparently leaked the information to his wife’s best friend. She then tweeted it out, causing international book shock and making The Cuckoo’s Calling a fast bestseller.

After it happened, Rowling was publicly upset, telling the press that she had enjoyed releasing the book under a pseudonym and not having hype surround her. The book had received positive reviews, but initially hadn’t sold well.

In addition to the fine and warning, Gossage’s firm paid Rowling’s legal costs after she sued them. They also made a donation to the charity of Rowling’s choice, the Soldiers’ Charity.

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Review: The Cuckoo’s Calling

Recap: It’s a death that has as much media coverage as the death of a One Direction member would warrant. Lula Landry, one of newest, youngest, and most gorgeous models in Britain has died. Lying on the ground next to her apartment building in London, Lula Landry appears to have fallen from her balcony. But was she pushed or did she jump? Considering her troubled history with drugs and mental instability, it is widely assumed that she jumped. After all, who would want to kill Lula Landry? But with all her fame, money, and beauty, the better question is who wouldn’t want to kill her?

That’s where Detective Cormoran Strike comes in. He’s hired by Lula’s adoptive brother, John Bristow, to delve deeper into Landry’s death. The offer couldn’t come at a better time for Strike, who’s been recently dumped, kicked out of his apartment, and is on the verge of bankruptcy. Considering how long it’s been since he’s had regular work, he’s a bit rusty. But when a new temporary secretary, Robin, starts working for him, she becomes more of an asset than he ever imagined a secretary could be.

Ultimately Strike and Robin unravel the case of Lula Landry, with lots of key players and lots of evidence previously overlooked by police.

Analysis: In one of only two books in her post-Harry Potter days, author J.K. Rowling (under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith) proves yet again that her easy-to-follow writing and complex web of characters with oh-so-many motives makes for a book that’s tough to put down. The more each character is described, the more we want to know what happens.

That being said, The Cuckoo’s Calling is — for the most part — your average detective novel. It also feels quite a bit longer than it needs to be. Written in third-person, the book comes from the perspective of Strike, so as readers, we get to play detective right along with him.

But Rowling/Galbraith does one thing that sets The Cuckoo’s Calling apart from the rest of today’s detective novels: considering Strike’s recent professional misfortune, it’s unclear if he’s actually capable of doing the job. Usually in a mystery like this, the detective is described as being one of the best, so it’s no surprise when he solves the case. Here, there’s some uncertainty – can Strike solve the case? Is there even a case to be solved? Those are the questions that keep the book moving.

MVP: Strike and Robin, collectively. The two make a good team. Even with little history or experience working together, their determination makes for a solid bit of detective work, while a friendship between them blossoms.

Get The Cuckoo’s Calling in hardcover for $15.19.

Or get it on your Kindle for $5.99.

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J.K. Rowling Pseudonym Leak Traced

It’s been years since the last Harry Potter novel was published, and yet author J.K. Rowling still knows how to make a splash. Last week, it was revealed that she had written another book, non Harry Potter-related, under a pseudonym. The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith, published in April, was actually written by Rowling herself.

News about The Cuckoo’s Calling made news around world and became an overnight bestseller. It left many scratching their heads: how did Rowling keep it a secret? And better yet, who ultimately leaked it? As it turns out, it was someone from a law firm.

According to The New York Times, one of the partners for Russells, an entertainment law firm based in London, told his wife’s best friend that J.K. Rowling wrote the book. The woman passed the information along to a columnist for The Sunday Times last week via Twitter and then quickly deleted her tweets.  Rowling admitted to writing the detective novel, and The Sunday Times published the first article regarding the book.

Since then, J.K. Rowling has expressed her disappointment in Russells, as Julie Bosman explains.

Through her publicist, Ms. Rowling released a statement saying that she was “disappointed.”

“A tiny number of people knew my pseudonym and it has not been pleasant to wonder for days how a woman whom I had never heard of prior to Sunday night could have found out something that many of my oldest friends did not know,” she said. “I had assumed that I could expect total confidentiality from Russells, a reputable professional firm and I feel very angry that my trust turned out to be misplaced.”

So why did J.K. Rowling decide to publish the book under a pseudonym? That might be one mystery that will remain unsolved.

Get The Cuckoo’s Calling in hardcover for $16.90.

Or get it on your Kindle for $9.99.

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