Tag Archives: Sheryl Sandberg

Review: Option B

417t2blcp9rl-_sx292_bo1204203200_Recap: Grief is no easy thing and like addiction, it is not something people can “overcome.” It’s something that simply becomes a part of our lives forever, and we are tasked with learning to manage it. If anyone knows about grief, it’s Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg who several years ago lost her husband suddenly. He died from heart-related problems at the age of 47 while working out at the gym.

Sheryl feared not only that she would never get over his death but that her children would never be happy again.  She turned to friends, family and experts to help her work through her grief. Along the way, she became close with psychologist, author and University of Pennsylvania professor Adam Grant, who helped her co-write Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy. As she writes in her book, “Option A (having her husband) is not available. So let’s just kick the shit out of Option B.”

Speaking to Grant and other psychologists, she writes about many theories that helped me to better understand why some of us make grief harder for ourselves than others. For instance, Sandberg talks about “The Three P’s: personalization, pervasiveness and permanence. The goal is to avoid the three P’s; avoid thinking this situation is all your fault, avoid thinking this will affect every part of your life and avoid thinking you will always feel this way.

Analysis: Sandberg’s Option B works in a way that many other self-help books don’t in that she offers concrete, easy-to-employ tactics for dealing with not only grief, but any kind of loss: unemployment (loss of job), divorce (loss of marriage), etc. They’re easy to put into everyday use, like stop saying “I’m sorry,” allow yourself cry breaks, do good deeds for other people, find ways of honoring the person you’re grieving so they don’t feel forgotten and talk about them with others, including co-workers.

She does this while still offering the same theories, analysis and results of psychological studies that other self-help books might also include. But she also tells short stories about people all over the country who have gone through horrific, life-changing events and overcome them. These real-life stories work as great examples for some of the psychological theories that we may not otherwise understand because of therapist jargon. They also worked for me as examples of people who have been forced to work through situations much more severe than mine. The thought process becomes: if they can get through that, I can certainly get through this.

I’d been wanting to read this book for so long after the death of my father, and while I (thankfully) found I had already employed some of these tactics into my own life to help deal with my grief, I also found this book helped me to better understand grief in general and understand why I’m still having trouble working past certain aspects of my grief. As Sandberg explains, grief is not considered to be a linear process, and it’s different for everyone. I have accepted my Option B. Thank you, Sheryl, for showing me what I need to do now to kick the shit out of it.

Get Option B in hardcover for $7.83. 

Or get it on your Kindle for $13.99.

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Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s Bestseller To Become a Movie

lean inFacebook’s chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg made waves last year when she released the nonfiction bestseller Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead. Despite the controversy (keep reading…), it seems the bestseller is headed for the big screen.

According to Los Angeles Times, Sony put in a bid for the movie “Lean In” to be written by Sandberg’s co-writer Nell Scovel. Execs promise the movie will not be about Sandberg, but a “narrative film from the themes contained within the book.”

Focused on the social issues that face women in the workforce, the book got a lot of praise from some, but hate from others. Some complained that Sheryl Sandberg doesn’t face the challenges of the “everyday woman” because she is one of the richest and most powerful women in the country. Others felt she claims that it’s up to women to make the changing needed to the workforce, and not corporations and companies themselves.

It’s not easy to make a fictional movie out of a nonfiction bestseller, though it has been done; take He’s Just Not That Into You, for example, which was turned into a movie starring Jennifer Aniston and Bradley Cooper, among many other well-known actors. That movie didn’t do nearly as well as the book, and I imagine it will be a similar case for “Lean In.”

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