Tag Archives: social media

Pottermore Launching ‘Harry Potter’ Book Club

wwbookclubIn case my “book club” — which, let’s be honest, is really just a blog and not an actual club — isn’t enough for you, soon you’ll also be able to participate in a Harry Potter Wizarding World Book Club, launched by the Pottermore web site.

All you have to do is register on the site and agree to read one Harry Potter book per month (or some over a few months since the books later in the series get longer), and you can use the virtual book club to discuss the books. The idea is to connect Potter fans from around the world — and of course, reinvigorate their love for HP.

Each week, Pottermore will announce a new theme to be discussed on a new Twitter account, @wwbookclub. The account is already active. Though the book club is set to officially launch this month, an exact date for the first topic doesn’t appear to have been announced yet. Stay tuned, Potter fans!

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Ivanka Trump Promoting Her Book Solely on Social Media

51kauwy0hjl-_sx329_bo1204203200_Ivanka Trump’s book Women Who Work is not the first book she’s written and promoted, but it is the first book she’s written and only been allowed to promote in one place: social media.

According to The New York Times, Trump promised not to promote her career advice book for women through a tour or media appearances. According to a spokeswomen, Trump consulted with the Office of Government Ethics. Because it would be “unethical” to promote something for her own “private gain” in her now public service capacity (as an official, but unpaid government employee in the White House), she can’t promote the book the way an author normally would.

So she’s sticking to social media, taking to Facebook and Instagram to plug the book.

Meanwhile, according to Entertainment Weekly, the book itself is not garnering particularly good reviews.

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Amazon Buys Social Media Book Site Goodreads

If people read books and then post reviews online — and don’t have their own blog, like this one! — there’s generally two places they’ll post them: Amazon and Goodreads. But now, the two are becoming one.

According to Salon, Amazon has bought the social media book site Goodreads. For more than a year, the site has used Amazon Product Advertising API for book data. Ever since then, Amazon has had somewhat of a grip on Goodreads, forbidding Goodreads to use that data in its mobile app. But now Amazon has tightened the reigns.

The terms of the deal were not made public. But people in the book industry are comparing this to Hitler and the Nazi invasion of Poland, which doesn’t bode well for Goodreads, authors, or its users.

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Twitter Fiction Festival

In the literary world, there are all kinds of events and festivals — book festivals, author signings, book readings, book sales, the list goes on and on. But just a few weeks ago, the world of literature merged with social media for the first ever Twitter Fiction Festival.

According to The L.A. Times, the festival was an online, virtual gathering that included authors from 20 different countries selected by a group of “experts.” One writer, for example, had to write a Greek myth in 100 characters. It was less of a lesson in great writing, and more of a lesson in concise writing. The festival also included some live events.

Personally, I think it would be kind of cool to read how the authors brought these elaborate stories down to just a few characters. In a nerdy way, I think it was probably a fun event. But part of me also wonders what the point is? Other than teaching writers how to connect on Twitter, I don’t see how a fun festival like this serves any purpose — unless it was just that, a fun festival.

Thoughts?

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Author Caught Writing Fake Amazon Reviews

The only thing better than a great writer is one who’s also humble. Crime writer RJ Ellory, apparently, does not fall into this category.

According to ABCNews.com, the author was caught writing positive Amazon reviews for his book and negative reviews for his competition’s books under a pseudonym. It was another writer, Jeremy Duns, who discovered the fake reviews, when he realized both “Jelly Bean” and “Nicodemus Jones” repeatedly wrote 5-star reviews for Ellory’s work, while trash-talking novels written by others.

Ellory also slipped up a few times, forgetting which account he was using and signing the reviews “Roger.”

The reviews were taken down after Ellory was caught, but not before other authors, like Duns, snapped screen grabs of the reviews and posted them to Twitter.

Ellory issues an apology statement to The Daily Telegraph, writing:

“The recent reviews – both positive and negative – that have been posted on my Amazon accounts are my responsibility and my responsibility alone.

“I wholeheartedly regret the lapse of judgment that allowed personal opinions to be disseminated in this way and I would like to apologise to my readers and the writing community.”

A spokesperson from the Crime Writers Association said this is happening more frequently — authors tooting their own horns, so to speak, on sites like Amazon and Twitter.

It’s times like this I miss the days without social media.

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Why It Pays To Be a Tweeting Author: Jennifer Weiner’s ‘Bachelorette’ Gig

For most of us, social media sites like Facebook and Twitter are domains to express how we feel about, well, pretty much anything. Sometimes we’re funny. Most of the time we’re not. But we tweet anyway in the hopes that someone will read our 140 attempts at getting attention. If you’re a bestselling author and write for a living, you know people will see those tweets. But when In Her Shoes author Jennifer Weiner wrote a Facebook post about Jason Mesnick from The Bachelor a few seasons back, she was surprised at the response she got.

So began her weekly Bachelor/Bachelorette live-tweets, which have now led to a new gig at Entertainment Weekly, according to a post on her Facebook page last month. Though I’ve been unable to find out any more details about it, Weiner states “I am THRILLED to announce that, starting 5/14, I’m going to be live-blogging ‘The Bachelorette’ for the kind folks at Entertainment Weekly! Stay tuned for details…”

Coincidentally, EW wrote up this article on Weiner and other celebrity tweeters in January. In the reality world of The Bachelor/Bachelorette, Jennifer Weiner has become a favorite tweeter. In fact it earned her a spot on Time‘s list of 140 Best Twitter feeds last year. So it’s no surprise it would lead to an EW gig like this. Weiner is outspoken, hilarious, and seems like the best friend you’ve never met — all perfect attributes for a good live-tweeter.

So for all your Bachelorette fans, here’s Weiner’s Twitter handle, @jenniferweiner, if you’re looking for someone to gossip with about the drama that’s set to begin tomorrow night at 8pm on ABC. Will you tune in?

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E-Readers Are Getting More Social

Here are a few reasons why e-readers are great: they’re portable, can hold hundreds of books in one device, and have wifi and Internet capabilities. Here are a few reasons why some are still hesitant to purchase an e-reader: setting bookmarks can be difficult, as can adding notes and highlights — though they are all still possible, and of course there’s just nothing like reading a real book.

But the e-reader experience may just be getting started. According to the Los Angeles Times, reading is becoming more and more like a social network. It’s called “social reading.” For instance, on the Amazon Kindle, people can post favorite passages to Facebook and Twitter. On Canada’s popular Kobo e-reader, you can see what people are reading, if they’re reading what you are, and join in on their comment string about the book. It not only bookmarks your pages; it keep statistics about your reading habits.

On an app called Subtext, readers can even connect with the author, as Carolyn Kellogg explains.

Built for the iPad and launched less than two months ago, Subtext offers all of the social reading elements with the added bonus of content from authors themselves. “I was very excited about this,” says Amy Stewart, author of “Wicked Plants” and “Wicked Bugs,” an L.A. Times bestseller….Marginal icons show where she added links, video, color images and commentary, including a “Spoiler Alert” warning just to see how the function worked (the determined reader has to tap a second time to see the spoiler). Just like on Facebook, Stewart can respond to reader comments, which also are indicated by icons in the margin.

For some, I imagine social reading could be a bit much. But since we’re social about everything else nowadays, why wouldn’t we be social about more clever habits, like reading? And as the article points out, it’s also the perfect way to enhance reading in a classroom. For those who are not interested in social reading, stick to a good old-fashioned book. But I wouldn’t entirely discount it.

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