Tag Archives: Twilight

Movie vs. Book: Breaking Dawn Part 2

Contributed by Jamie Costa

As soon as the movie started I was very happy with how they made Bella (Kristen Stewart) look like the beautiful vampire that she was depicted to look like in the book. I was also very satisfied with the fact that the movie included Renesemee’s rapid growing rate along with her impressive beauty and form of communication with the touch of her hand to the opposing persons face.

For the most part, the movie stayed true to the book,  but I was disappointed with a few scenes. For instance, in the book, when Bella visiting J. Jenks, she first went to a desolate town due to multiple addresses that she found and met with J. Jenks’ personal assistant. The assistant then gave her hints as to what kind of business Jenks was involved in, which encouraged her to make passports for daughter, Renesmee, and Jacob (Taylor Lautner). Jacob then took Renesmee away to keep her safe. The movie simply showed Bella meeting J. Jenks for dinner to pick up the passports and birth certificates that Jasper already had him make for her. Even though in the book, Bella meets J. Jenks for dinner eventually, she gives the order herself and does not stay for dinner like she does in the movie. This was an insignificant part of the movie that one would not realize if they did not read the book, but nonetheless, it didn’t match up with the book.

It’s no comparison, however, to the most aggravating part of the movie: the ending. The inaccuracies begin when Aro touches Alice’s hand to read her mind. In the book, Alice returns from her journey with Jasper with proof that another half-mortal, half-immortal child like Renesmee exists — a child who has caused no harm in protecting the vampire law of keeping their existence a secret. But the entire fighting scene is wrong. Nothing even comparable to that happens in the book. Author Stephanie Meyer doesn’t write fighting into the book; she simply has Alice reveal Nahuel’s existence as an immortal-mortal child. In the book, that’s enough proof for Aro, who then calls off the violence. The movie, on the other hand, has a full-on battle scene. I understand this battle scene was included to provide more action to the film, but to someone who read and loves the books, such as myself, it could have been a very disappointing ending if it was left that way. Thankfully, after this vision of Alice’s that they show, they provide the real ending of the book to conclude the film.

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More YA Novels Optioned for the Big Screen

It appears that Twilight and The Hunger Games are trendsetters, paving the way for more young adult novels to be made into feature films.

According tothe L.A. Times,a number of other young adult novels are being optioned for films, including hits like Trylle Trilogy and The False Prince. Here’s a look at some of the other novels producers are considering.

Considering I haven’t heard of any of these novels, I doubt they’ll have the success and impact on the big screen that Twilight and The Hunger Games have had. It will also be interesting to see how many of these books actually make it that far — since right now, they’re only being optioned. It’s always fun to see your favorite book translated to film, but are the movie-book-adaptations starting to become a little overkill? What do you guys think?

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‘Fifty Shades’ Now Has Its Own Fan Fiction

E.L. James started writing international bestseller Fifty Shades of Grey as Twilight fan fiction, substituting Edward and Bella for Christian and Anastasia and getting rid of the vampires. But now in a truly meta turn, Fifty Shades of Grey has its own fan fiction.

According to Entertainment Weekly, Fanfiction.net — where James originally started writing her Twilight fan fiction — is hosting a number of Fifty Shades fan fiction stories, which only date back to this March. Is it all becoming too much? Hillary Busis explains.

The concept of fan fiction itself, of course, is hardly new: “There was fan fiction before you called it fan fiction, and before there was copyright it was called writing,” University of Utah professor Anne Jamison told the AP when asked about this new trend. But would-be novelists who are writing fan fiction based on someone else’s fan fiction? That’s some seriously kooky hall of mirrors stuff.

What happens if one of these stories eventually morphs into another “original” novel? Will all fiction one day be traceable back to Twilight?

To be honest, I think the concept of fan fiction is a little odd, but that’s just me. This whole Fifty Shades fan fiction thing is as meta as meta gets, and it definitely drives me a little nuts. Love the books, but do we really need fan fiction about them? What do you think?

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Review: Fifty Shades of Grey

Recap: A bestselling erotica novel that’s taking the female population by storm, Fifty Shades of Grey is, in fact, all it’s cracked up to be. The first book in the adult trilogy tells the story of Anastasia Steele, a naive, inexperienced college student who falls for a multi-millionaire, uber sexual businessman, Christian Grey. They meet when Ana interviews him for her school paper, as a favor to her roommate. But their unlikely chemistry leads to a dominant-submissive sexual relationship that has the two lusting for each other more and more.

For Ana, the kinky and aggressive sex is both frightening, but exciting. And with nothing else to compare it to, she considers his offer to sign a contract to be his Submissive, or Sub. While part of her feels like a sex slave, another part of her just can’t get enough of Christian Grey, who claims and proves to be fifty shades of [messed] up.

Analysis: When people talk about the book — which is the first in a trilogy about Miss Steele and Mr. Grey — the discussion centers on the kinky sex. The book is flying off the shelves, encouraging middle-aged women and housewives everywhere are starting to get their grooves back. But there’s more depth to the story than just sex.

Like any girl would, Ana falls for Grey. The story becomes less about sex and more about her attempt to “change” Christian and get him to open up. It’s what any girl who’s ever dated or liked a “bad boy” hopes to do. So women are reading this book not just to get in the mood, but to see if Ana is the one to finally turn a bad boy into someone good. Can she do it? If she does, there’s hope for us yet! She’s living every woman’s dream — having crazy sex with an older, gorgeous, playful but mysterious man who also happens to be rich.

The author E.L. James is British and began writing the series as Twilight fan fiction, and the Twilight similarities are evident — the controlling boyfriend, the innocent girlfriend, Ana’s nervousness and tendency to bite her lip like Bella. But just because it began as Twilight fan fiction doesn’t mean it should be a turnoff if you’re not a Twilight fan. If anything, the oddball writing is the book’s biggest flaw. James uses dumb phrases repeatedly, “Oh my!” and dictionary words, like bemusing. (Just say confused!) Also, Ana is a college student and doesn’t own her own laptop. Come on, E.L. James. What college student doesn’t have a computer or an email address?

But the sex, love, and lust are more than enough of a reason to look past the silly writing and get in the mood with this book.

MVP: Christian Grey. So complicated, so mysterious, so desirable. He’s every girl’s dream man, and yet, he’s the absolute worst boyfriend. As much as I hate him, I love him — again, a feeling that every woman has felt at one point or another.

Get Fifty Shades of Grey in paperback for $9.57.

Or on your Kindle for $9.99.

You can also get the whole Fifty Shades trilogy on your Kindle for just $29.99.

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Review: The Hunger But Mainly Death Games

Recap: In a post-apocalyptic world, only one girl stands the chance to win the epic teen death battle against 23 other opponents: Bratniss Everclean. The Hunger But Mainly Death Games is a witty, ridiculous take on the popular Suzanne Collins trilogy The Hunger Games. Instead of Katniss Everdeen, the story follows Bratniss Everclean. While the overall story is basically the same — teenagers fighting each other to death in a nationally-televised event — the parodied version goes to new extremes.

For instance, the fighters kill each other through cannibalism, defecation, and strangulation with intestines. The book is at times grotesque and disturbing. The author seems to have some kind of obsession with defecation throughout the book. The characters often don’t shower, live in garbage, and eat moldy mayonnaise.

But there are other components of the story that are rather brilliant, such as its breaking of the fourth wall, its self-aware quality, and its jokes about young adult teen novels in general — not to mention cracks at Harry Potter and Twilight. It also uses very current pop culture references to make cheap, but hysterical jokes.

Analysis: To be honest, the potty humor and violence throughout the book was too much for me. Though it was funny, it was disgusting. But I also appreciated it in that it was the author’s way of pointing out how ridiculous the actual Hunger Games story is, when you really think about it.

But the highlights were the book’s references to other popular young adult fiction. For instance, the character Hagridmitch. He’s the parodied version of Katniss’s Hunger Games trainer Haymitch, but he’s actually Hagrid from Harry Potter. Somehow stuck in the wrong young adult teen novel, he constantly refers to Bratniss as Hermoine, talking about Harry and dragons. That is, until Oofie (the parodied Effie) stops him to avoid copyright problems. Hagridmitch appears throughout the book and almost always had me laughing. There’s also a scene that references Twilight author Stephenie Meyer in the most hilarious way.

The book also takes jabs at young adult fiction in general — like its emphasis on love stories — in The Hunger But Mainly Death Games, Pita (the parodied Peeta) is a crazy stalker, the popular use of first-person narration and the often ludicrous decisions made by the main characters.

Some fans of The Hunger Games may not like the book. The Hunger But Mainly Death Games, as I said, points out some of the ridiculous aspects of the original novel and obviously, makes fun of it. Some may also not enjoy the level of grotesque jokes. But overall, it’s a funny, quick read that’s sure to make you laugh at least a few times, whether you’re a fan of The Hunger Games or not.

MVP: Hagridmitch, without a doubt. The author was brilliant to include this character that serves as a metamorphosis of Hagrid and Haymitch. After all, the two characters serve virtually the same purposes in both teen series. Hagridmitch was consistently the funniest character in the book, and in a parody, that’s a perfect character.

Get The Hunger But Mainly Death Games now for just $7.79.

And get the e-book for just $0.99!

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Get The Twilight Saga Complete Collection in Hardcover for $59, Down from $97

If you’re a vampire-obsessed teenager, you like have all the Twilight novels. If you’re the parent of a vampire-obsessed teen, you probably bought them. But just in case, here’s a deal on the complete collection that you can really sink your teeth into. It’s all four books —  Twilight, New Moon, Eclipse, and Breaking Dawn in hardcover for just $59, down from $97.

This collection is the ultimate way to learn or re-learn all the details of the crazy love story before the final movie — Twilight: Breaking Dawn Part 2 — is released later this year. Hey, the saga may not have the morals of good vs. evil like Harry Potter, but it’s one heck of a captivating love story.

Get The Twilight Saga Complete Collection while you can.

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Movie vs. Book: The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part I

By Jenelle Tortorella

Finally, we’ve reached the last installment of what could arguably be called the most popular love story of Generation Y:  Twilight.

Breaking Dawn is the final page-turning, vampire-loving, werewolf-fighting book in Stephanie Meyer’s saga that not only flew off the shelves, but has many a person, young and old, male and female, asking themselves one simple question: Team Edward or Team Jacob?

The books-turned-successful-movie franchise have followed heroine Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart), her undead love Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson), and best wolfy friend Jacob Black (Taylor Lautner), as the trio navigates the realms of mythical creates, forbidden love, and, now, a wedding. The producers of the film wisely chose to split the fourth novel into two movies, giving themselves more time to develop plotlines; despite that, if you haven’t read the books or seen the previous films, you’re going to be lost.

Although many people I’ve spoken with disagree, the first part of the movie is my favorite. Maybe it’s because I was tired of the brooding, teenage-angsty mood that so dominated the first three movies, and finally wanted to smile while watching these films. The wedding is light, joyous, and at times funny.  Bella’s father Charlie Swan (Billy Burke) yet again steals any scene he’s in. There’s some minimal drama — a given with any family gathering — but it’s done well, muted, behind the scenes, and not attention grabbing.  I actually prefer the way the opening to Breaking Dawn Part 1 was done in the film more than it was explained in the book; you’re able to get out of Bella’s head and enjoy a truly beautiful wedding.

We then follow our lovebirds to South America as they begin a honeymoon unlike many: we’re unsure if Bella is going to make it past her wedding night alive — one of the many dangers of marrying a vampire. Spoiler: she does, although the headboard of the bed frame doesn’t. While the backdrop of Isle Esme is breathtaking, I felt that the movie lost some of its pacing here. The length of time spent on the honeymoon in the book is understandable because you’re hearing Bella’s thoughts; in the movie it just feels long.

As the film navigates through the problems that arise following the honeymoon, I think this is where this movie outdoes its predecessors. First, the acting feels much more natural, with each character clearly becoming more comfortable in their roles I hardly cringed at any of the lines. Second, the special effects prove how far this franchise has come with my mental pictures vividly coming alive on screen; ‘disturbing’ doesn’t begin to cover it.

Most importantly, the book is not lost in this film. Sure, there are some plot changes, like a completely unnecessary and random fight between the vamps and wolves, but the core of the story is still there. You feel the joy, pain, loss, and hurt at the decisions the characters are making, as it should be.

In all, this movie captures all of the good and bad of the Twilight saga. Drama-packed, it’s a perfect guilty pleasure. Just make sure you stay for the credits.

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