Tag Archives: bestseller

Ballerina Misty Copeland Releases Book

misty-copeland-book-cover-largeMisty Copeland is the first black female ballerina to be named a principal dancer by the American Ballet Theatre. Now she’s adding “author” to her resume.

Copeland has released a new book entitled Ballerina Body, focusing on both the physical and mental strength it takes to better your body in the best way possible. She stresses that it’s not a “dieting” book, instead saying “For me, it was just getting myself into the best shape that it could, but understanding that it’s OK to be different. If you’re talented and gifted enough, it doesn’t matter what you look like.”

It sounds like a mix of self-help, cookbook and memoir. The book includes inspirational words of encouragement, exercises, recipes, and her “secrets” to being strong mentally and physically.

It’s so important for a woman in her position to write a book like this, to inspire girls to care for their bodies the healthy way instead of starving themselves unhealthily, not to mention the volumes it speaks for black girls who may not have ever envisioned a future like Misty Copeland’s.

Get Ballerina Body in hardcover now for $15.59. 

Or on your Kindle for $15.99.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under News Articles

Limited Series vs. Book: Big Little Lies, “Serious Mothering”

 

The tension between mommies and daddies builds in this second episode of the limited serious version of Big Little Lies, as we get deeper insight into Madeline’s marriage and Celeste’s. We see fewer flashes of police activity alluding to the horrible incident that eventually happens and instead more flashes of graphic and violent sex, as well as the now-recurring images of Jane running down the beach in a blue dress.

Another incident in school happens in this second episode, with the girls daring Jane’s son, Ziggy, and Regina’s daughter, Amabella, to kiss. Though it’s hard to say since we never actually see it. Instead, we only witness the buildup to and aftermath of the “kiss,” much in the same way the show refers to the murder that makes up the main plot of this story.

The kiss that the children are “pushed” to do in class is not part of the book, Big Little Lies. It seems the writers have added this incident as a device to further build tension between all the parents of the children involved. The writers divide the couples even further when, in the episode, Celeste and Madeline attend the same yoga class as Madeline’s ex-husband Nathan and his new wife, Bonnie. Then we learn that Bonnie has helped Madeline and Nathan’s teenage daughter to get birth control pills, pushing Madeline to hate Bonnie even more — and rightfully so! As a stepmom, she absolutely does not have the right to help the teen get birth control when her birth mother is still an active part of her life. This is yet another plot point added to the series that is not part of the book. Yet another thing the series adds in this episode is Madeline’s ex-husband and current husband meeting up for a little “chat,” which quickly turns into a heated exchange.

All of this is an attempt to show the motivations each adult has for one another and adds to the suspense of who’s been murdered and who’s the murderer. All that’s well and good, but it also strays from the book and, in my opinion, just further drags out the story that’s already full of suspense and intrigue. These added scenes and scenarios also make Madeline far less likeable from the way she comes across in the book. Yes, she’s a little nutty in the book, but we still like her.

The show does a good job, however, of foreshadowing some of the big moments to come, including the introduction of Harry Hippo — yes, he actually matters in this story! — and finally we see how abusive Celeste and her husband’s relationship really is. However, her openness about it with Madeline at the bar is a complete 180 from the book.

So far, the show continues to keep in line with basic plot points, and while I see why it’s adding what it’s adding, I don’t know how necessary it really is.

Leave a comment

Filed under Movie vs. Book, Reviews

Review: The Corrections

thecorrectionscvrRecap: Alfred and Enid are your typical Midwestern couple; they did their best to raise a family and provide, and now that they’re in retirement, they’re combating Alfred’s Parkinson’s and doing what they can to best stay in touch with their three grown children, living far away in New York City and Philadelphia.

The plot goes back and forth between the 1960’s and present-day so we get perspectives from each of the kids, Gary, Chip and Denise, both as children and adults. We learn about Gary’s success in his career and in building a family, about Chip’s rise and disastrous fall and Denise’s dabbling in sexual experimentation starting at a young age and ultimately affecting her career as a chef. We also see how Alfred’s business decisions over the years have upset first, his wife and now, his children.

Much of the story revolves around Enid trying to convince Alfred to take advantage of a financial opportunity from the railroad company from which he retired. It’s an opportunity that could earn them a large sum of money, and when Gary catches wind of the situation, he also tries to steer his father toward earning the extra cash. But Alfred can’t be bothered. In his old age and with his Parkinson’s, he feels as though he has enough to deal with. All this is just part of what drives the family into a financial and stress-induced panic.

Analysis: So much of this story is about simply the inner-workings of families and how even small decisions and actions can have big impacts on the people to whom we are closest. While the title, The Corrections, is most directly related to the economic and tech boom of the 1990’s, it’s clear the title also refers to the ways in which each character is trying to correct each other and themselves, sometimes with drugs, sex, love or money. But ultimately, they (and we, the readers) learn family connections run more deeply and more complicated than any other, and as much as we want to “correct” each other, sometimes we just can’t.

The novel gets a lot of praise for its statement about an anxiety-driven America; some have even called it prescient in its take on Americans in a post-9/11 world because the book was published and released several days before 9/11 happened. Reading the history of the book’s timing is fascinating, though I doubt I would have picked up on that had I not read about it beforehand.

I was individually intrigued by each of the characters and loved their stories, but at points I kept waiting for something — anything — to happen. Despite not feeling entirely hooked, I ultimately wept like a baby at the end anyway, when I learned how each of the characters ended up. Alfred’s battle with dementia and Parkinson’s resonated with me personally, and that probably has a lot to do with my emotional reaction. But I realized something else when I started crying then: I truly cared about the characters after all. A book like that has all the makings of a great one.

MVP: Denise. She was extremely complex without being really annoying about it. She also makes some of the biggest sacrifices for the family, even though it’s not what we’d expect.

Get The Corrections now in paperback for $10.62. 

Or get it on your Kindle for $9.99.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Reviews

Limited Series vs. Book: Big Little Lies, “Somebody’s Dead”

A blur of flashing red and blue lights, flashes of women in pearls, and images of Elvis and detectives spin in a dizzying display of a dress-up event gone wrong in the opening minutes of the premiere episode of Big Little Lies. The HBO limited series is set to adapt the bestselling Liane Moriarty novel of the same name over the course of seven hour-long episodes.

The density and complexity of the novel certainly lends itself to being a limited series and not a movie that would inevitably leave out plot points for time. That said, the premiere episode starts off a little slow. It focuses on exposition, bringing both the drama of the “Blonde Bobs” — or crazy mothers — around which the murder mystery story revolves and the comedy — particularly from Reese Witherspoon, who plays the character of Madeline.

School orientation is a stressful day for everyone, including children and parents. Madeline proves as much by almost getting into a car crash with a car full of teens, including her daughter from her first marriage and then twisting her ankle. This is where the story starts, in a flashback after the first few minutes establish someone has died at a school fundraiser. This opening episode stays (mostly) true to the story, setting the tone for the tiny beach town of stuck-up mothers and their precocious children.

We meet Madeline, her daughters, her husband, ex-husband and his new wife, Bonnie, as well as Madeline’s best friend Celeste and new friend Jane. Each has kids in the same first grade class, where little Amabella is apparently choked on the first day by a boy in class. She places blame on Ziggy, Jane’s son, who denies having hurt the little girl.

That’s about as far as we get into the story, but in some beautifully shot flashback images, we get the idea that Jane and Celeste have some pretty haunting histories. The visual markers of this are perhaps less subtle than those in the book, but they certainly grab attention.

Differences from the book include the story happening in California instead of Australia and the kids being in first-grade instead of kindergarten (perhaps another year allows for them to be more mature and have more of a voice than in the book?). The series also softens the relationship between Madeline and her older daughter. While they’re sour with each other in the first half of the episode, they have a nice moment at the end that doesn’t really happen in the book until — well, ever. In the show, Ziggy also asks his mother why Amabella said he choked her when he didn’t. That doesn’t happen in the book. While that may seem like a minor detail, it’s really an important one for the overall story and works to make the viewer more sympathetic to Ziggy and Jane.

But the story is so good, the setup so well done, the child actors so good, and Reese Witherspoon’s portrayal of Madeline so comically spunky, there’s no doubt I’ll be watching the rest of the series.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Movie vs. Book, Reviews

Carrie Fisher’s Books Selling Like Wildfire

article-1088513-0289ce2d000005dc-747_468x468Just two weeks after her death, Carrie Fisher’s books are selling like wildfire. In fact, they’re selling so many copies, Simon & Schuster has ordered reprints of every one of her books, according to Entertainment Weekly.

“All of them have remained in print, but our supply was wiped out by demand,” said Jonathan Karp, President and Publisher of Simon & Schuster Publishing Group.  Several of them have topped bestseller lists in recent weeks.

Titles that have been reprinted include Fisher’s 2008 memoir Wishful Drinking, her 1987 novel Postcards From the Edge, her 2011 memoir Shockoholic and her 2004 novel The Best Awful. Her latest memoir, The Princess Diarist, also warranted a reprint from its publisher, Blue Rider Press.

Frankly, none of this is a surprise. It’s the same thing we see when a music artist dies and their albums and songs shoot to the top of the charts. It’s heartbreaking to see Fisher go, but lucky for us, her words live on.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Author News, News Articles

New Dan Brown ‘Robert Langdon’ Novel Coming

originWhether or not you saw or read Inferno — which you absolutely should have — have no fear; Dan Brown is blessing us all with another ‘Robert Langdon’ novel. Yes, I said blessing because yes, I truly love his books.

According to his web site, Dan Brown’s next book in the series is Origin, due to be released September 26, 2017.

Little is known about the  novel. It was only recently announced, and there isn’t even cover art yet. What we do know is that it will once again involve Brown’s character Robert Langdon, the Harvard symbologist and will “thrust” him “into the dangerous intersection of humankind’s two most enduring questions, and the earth-shaking discovery that will answer them,” according to the press release.

I, for one, am all in, but I hope Brown’s books continue to sell. Inferno, the movie, did…well…less than stellar in theaters, so hopefully people aren’t starting to get sick of this character and format. They truly are fun, adventurous, dark and thought-provoking books.

Leave a comment

Filed under Author News, News Articles

Movie vs. Book: Inferno

**Note: This post does include spoilers about both the novel and movie versions of Inferno. 

Robert Langdon wakes up in a hospital. He has been shot, doesn’t realize that he’s in Florence, Italy — and not Boston, Massachusetts — and doesn’t remember anything that’s happened in the last 48 hours. So begins Inferno, the latest and easily one of the best of Dan Brown’s bestsellers conspiracy thriller novels that have been captivating readers since The Da Vinci Code was released.

In the latest adventure, Langdon teams up with his nurse, Sienna Brooks, and finds a projector in one of his pockets that displays Botticell’s Map of Hell. He knows that whatever reason he’s in Italy, it must have something to do with this map. Over the course of the novel, he discovers that he has been brought to Italy by the World Health Organization to solve a puzzle, whose answer indicates the location of some kind of virus or plague created by a billionaire geneticist named Bertrand Zobrist. Zobrist is well-known for his teachings against overpopulation, so it makes sense he would create a plague that would wipe out the population.

The reason why I believe Inferno was such a successful Dan Brown novel is because it veered far from the others, avoiding the format we’ve come to expect from a Robert Langdon novel. Langdon wakes up and not only has to solve the puzzle, but his amnesia is so bad, he doesn’t even know why he’s solving it!  The young ingenue with whom Langdon teams up is actually working against him! And what’s more — he does NOT solve the puzzle in time! The plague gets out after all. The end of Inferno is not only sad, it’s unsettling and alarming.

The movie followed the book so well until the moment when the characters arrive at the Hagia Sofia in Turkey, where the plague is expected to be released. The movie ends there. Langdon locates the soluble bag that contains the virus, Sienna is killed, and the WHO gets the bag before it dissolves and leaks out the virus. The novel, however, has much more story. We find out that yes, Sienna Brooks was working against Langdon, but she also wants to stop the virus from getting out and is essentially a good person. In the novel, they also learn that the virus had been released a week earlier anyhow, so the chase that led them there was irrelevant; it’s already out. The good news is that the plague is not a deadly one, but one that causes sterility.

It’s obvious why the movie adaptation’s ending is so different. Everyone wants a Hollywood ending. The idea of the movie ending with a sterility plague released is horribly pessimistic. Not to mention, viewers would condemn the fact that Langdon wasn’t really much of a hero after all. On the other hand, the book ending the way it did totally works. Sure, it’s unsettling, but it makes you think. People watch movies to make them happy. People read books to make them think.

Get Inferno now in paperback for $7.40.

Or on your Kindle for $9.99.

Leave a comment

Filed under Movie vs. Book, Reviews