Tag Archives: self-help

Ivanka Trump Promoting Her Book Solely on Social Media

51kauwy0hjl-_sx329_bo1204203200_Ivanka Trump’s book Women Who Work is not the first book she’s written and promoted, but it is the first book she’s written and only been allowed to promote in one place: social media.

According to The New York Times, Trump promised not to promote her career advice book for women through a tour or media appearances. According to a spokeswomen, Trump consulted with the Office of Government Ethics. Because it would be “unethical” to promote something for her own “private gain” in her now public service capacity (as an official, but unpaid government employee in the White House), she can’t promote the book the way an author normally would.

So she’s sticking to social media, taking to Facebook and Instagram to plug the book.

Meanwhile, according to Entertainment Weekly, the book itself is not garnering particularly good reviews.

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Ballerina Misty Copeland Releases Book

misty-copeland-book-cover-largeMisty Copeland is the first black female ballerina to be named a principal dancer by the American Ballet Theatre. Now she’s adding “author” to her resume.

Copeland has released a new book entitled Ballerina Body, focusing on both the physical and mental strength it takes to better your body in the best way possible. She stresses that it’s not a “dieting” book, instead saying “For me, it was just getting myself into the best shape that it could, but understanding that it’s OK to be different. If you’re talented and gifted enough, it doesn’t matter what you look like.”

It sounds like a mix of self-help, cookbook and memoir. The book includes inspirational words of encouragement, exercises, recipes, and her “secrets” to being strong mentally and physically.

It’s so important for a woman in her position to write a book like this, to inspire girls to care for their bodies the healthy way instead of starving themselves unhealthily, not to mention the volumes it speaks for black girls who may not have ever envisioned a future like Misty Copeland’s.

Get Ballerina Body in hardcover now for $15.59. 

Or on your Kindle for $15.99.

 

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‘Dance Moms’ 13-Year-Old Star To Pen Memoir, Fiction Trilogy

maddie-ziegler-435Some people spend their entire lives writing to pen the perfect book. For Maddie Zeigler, it only took 13  years. But wait. That is her entire life considering the Dance Moms star is just 13  years old.

According to Entertainment Weekly, Zeigler is working on writing both a memoir and a YA trilogy about dance for Gallery Books and Aladdin Books. The Maddie Diaries will reflect on her years starring the Lifetime reality TV show Dance Moms. It will also include advice and lessons for teens and dancers. It’s set to be released in March of 2017.

Her fiction novels will also be about — you guessed it! — young dancers. The novels are set to be released in the Fall 2017, Fall 2018 and Fall 2019.

IMHO, there will always be a market for people who want to read about dancers — whether it’s young people who dream of being professional dancers or those — like me — who used to dance and feel a sense of nostalgia when they read books about it (see Astonish Me).

Zeigler is a famous dancer, best known for Dance Moms and for playing mini-Sia in many of popstar Sia’s music videos and performances. Currently Zeigler is a judge on the kids version of So You Think You Can Dance.

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Review: Year of Yes

year-of-yes-9781476777092_hr-476Recap: When Grey’s Anatomy/ Scandal/ How to Get Away With Murder writer/ creator/ producer/ extraordinaire Shonda Rhimes realized she said “no” a lot, she decided something needed to change. Her sister had pointed out to her during Thanksgiving a few years ago that Shonda Rhimes, the woman who runs ABC’s Thursday night TV show lineup, may have been saying “yes” to more work and more amazing shows — and for that, we are forever grateful — but she wasn’t doing much for herself or her children. When she came to this shocking revelation, she decided that for one year, she would say “yes” to anything and everything that scared her.

And she so wonderfully documented it all for us. She said “yes” to attending events and giving speeches that she would normally turn down without hesitation. She said “yes” to watching what she ate and taking care of her health for the first time in years — and lost a ton of weight doing it. She said “yes” to doing what she wanted, even if that meant losing some friends along the way and ending a relationship. She said “yes” to playing with her children more often. She said “yes” to getting help from a nanny. And then she said “yes” to putting it in a book so we could learn the ways of her almighty awesomeness and badassery.

Analysis: My telling you many of the things Shonda Rhimes said “yes” to does not ruin the book in any way because this book is about so much more than saying “yes” to your fears. It’s about finding yourself and growing up, even when you think you already have. Year of Yes is a unique combination of memoir and self-help book that not only inspires, but energizes. I learned so much about Shonda Rhimes’ life and world, including all the fun details and anecdotes I’d hope for from any memoir. She writes a lot about her family, her career, and her kinship with the character she created, Christina Yang. But I also found that I had some of the same fears as Rhimes does, the same fears that many women have.

This book taught me how to take a compliment (because I deserve it!), and it taught me that difficult conversations are important to have, even if you think you might lose a friend (he/she probably wasn’t a very good one anyway!). I gained a new outlook and perspective from this book. And what’s better: it’s written in the very way Rhimes writes her TV shows. It felt familiar. Rhimes felt like my friend. It was like I could hear Ellen Pompeo as Meredith Grey or Kerry Washington as Olivia Pope saying certain sections of the book out loud. It became clear to me how much of Rhimes’ personality comes out in her TV characters, so it was nice, for once, to see her come out of her shell through this book instead of hiding behind one of her characters.

MVP:  Shonda Rhimes. Publishing a book like is courageous. I couldn’t help but think of all the formerly close friends of hers buying this book and reading the sections about them. Putting it all out there is a scary thing. It is the ultimate “yes,” and Rhimes astounded me by doing it.

Get Year of Yes in paperback for $8.46.

Or get it on your Kindle for $12.99.

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Oprah Penning New Book

After having co-authored five books and writing a monthly column in her own magazine, Oprah Winfrey is coming out with a new book.

According to The New York TimesWinfrey has written a book about life — its struggles and inspirations. Called What I Know For Sure, the book is named after and adapted from the column Winfrey writes in her monthly O, The Oprah Magazine.

The book is being marketed as a self-help book meant to “guide” people to become “their best selves.”

What I Know for Sure is due out in September, and will be published by Flatiron Books, a new nonfiction imprint of Macmillan.

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Review: My Story, My Song

Recap: Every person who has reached a high level of success has done so because of his or her parents. If the person had good parents, they motivated and supported their children. If the person had bad parents, he or she learned from their mistakes and chose not to repeat them.

That’s why the story of Lucimarian Roberts, Good Morning America co-anchor Robin Roberts’ mother, is so inspiring. She is one of the good parents – a mother who encouraged her children to keep trying and who taught them the importance of love, kindness, and bravery. That’s the story we read in My Story, My Song, which was told to Missy Buchanan by Lucimarian Roberts. It also features chapter commentary from Robin Roberts herself.

­­Lucimarian Roberts was the first person in her family to attend college – Howard University on a scholarship, no less. She married one of the original — and few black — Tuskegee Airmen. She raised four successful children, and moved them around the world to 27 different places because of her husband’s job. She taught. She played piano, sang, and recorded a CD. She gave back to her community, participating in Church groups and local organizations wherever she lived. Not to mention, she lived through Hurricane Katrina, survived a bad case of pneumonia, mourned the loss of her husband in 2004, and dealt with her daughter Robin’s battle with cancer.

Lucimarian Roberts shares her story in this spiritual, uplifting book that makes you realize anything is possible.

Analysis: It’s clear that Lucimarian Roberts is a strong woman. She relies on God and music to fight through the difficult times. In My Story, My Song, she tells her story, lesson by lesson instead of chronologically. It works, allowing the reader to focus on what she did and not when she did it.

As a fan of Robin Roberts, however, I had hoped to hear more from Robin herself. Robin writes commentaries for each chapter, but they’re brief anecdotes that don’t entirely correspond with the chapter.  Lucimarian delivers small glimpses into Robin’s life, like the Thanksgiving she spent with Robin and Diane Sawyer after her husband passed away —  but it took me a while to realize this story’s not nearly as much about Robin as it is about Lucimarian.

The story is also very focused on religion, including Bible passages and hymns throughout the book. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but it’s not something that piques my interest. However, I respect that this is a large part of Roberts’ life and therefore makes sense that it’s included.

That being said, it’s still a moving story about a woman who has had to deal with so much and seems to have conquered it all.

MVP: Lucimarian Roberts. Read above.
Get My Story, My Song in hardcover now for $10.98.

Or get it on your Kindle for $9.99.

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Review: Memoirs of Normalcy

We all need help every once in a while. When a self-help book was sent to me by a dear friend and former co-worker of mine, I decided I’d get over what people would think of me when they saw me reading a self-help book and give it a try. But Joleene DesRosiers Moody’s Memoirs of Normalcy: Journey from Sedentary to Extraordinary is a breath of fresh air for those who are hesitant to admit they have a problem.

Memoirs of Normalcy not only encourages you to change your thoughts, let go, and overcome your fears. It also tells the author’s story — a story about struggles with addiction, changing careers, finding love, and exploring yourself. At times it seems like DesRosiers Moody has dealt with it all. We can all find a little piece to relate to — in a good way! Reading about her decision to leave the television news business and enter the world of motivational speaking seems foreign to most of us — albeit a little crazy. But she did it. She learned from it. And now she passes along her words of wisdom to us.

It’s not your typical self-help book that tells you what to do. It’s a self-help combined with a memoir. By sharing her personal experiences, we understand with specific examples why and how all this advice works. For instance, DesRosiers Moody talks about her post-TV news job search. She was down; she had just about given up when all of a sudden she got not one, but a number of offers. She uses this example to explain why there’s no such thing as instant gratification, but that our time will come as long as we understand the importance of patience and positive thinking.

The first half of the book focuses on advice. The second half walks us through her two-week journey to a meditation camp a few years back. Without being hokey, she describes the ways in which it changed her life, making it easy for us to understand just how much meditation can travel to the depths of your soul.

Is DesRosiers Moody spiritual? Of course. Can that sometimes be annoying? For some people, probably yes. But what you have to understand when you pick up the book is that when you’ve been down as low as this author — and most of us probably have at one point or another — there’s nowhere left to go but to a space of spirituality and self-reflection.

DesRosiers Moody’s personal story is encouraging enough to push any reader to make a change and stay positive.

Get Memoirs of Normalcy in paperback now for just $12.47.

Or get it on your Kindle for just $3.99!

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